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Audiophile/physicist advances 3D audio

Rich Pell
3/23/2011 04:55 PM EDT

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kdboyce
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re: Audiophile/physicist advances 3D audio
kdboyce   4/5/2011 12:22:25 AM
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If you want true spatial 3D sound, all elements of the sound or recording should be individually spatialized. That is best accomplished using a monaural sound which is then positioned in 3D space using Head Related Transfer Function calculations and then applying crosstalk cancellation to the 2 speaker configuration. The result should approximate what each ear should hear (binaural hearing). The best result would be in headphones which can provide the most accurate binaural representation of the spatialized sound.

bcarso
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re: Audiophile/physicist advances 3D audio
bcarso   3/24/2011 11:05:31 PM
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I skimmed through the paper and it does look like pretty decent stuff, as well as being reasonably well-documented (Cooper-Bauck cited early on among others; Bauck is misspelled but so it goes). And I realize that the article doesn't exactly say that other virtualization techniques require greater-than-2 loudspeakers, but it could give that impression. Certainly most wavefield synthesis requires a whole bunch. Chouieri is also candid about various pitfalls in his paper, including the fact that many pop recordings are done in ways that will map ineffectively to his approach. The Bach tribute at the end is cute.

bcarso
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re: Audiophile/physicist advances 3D audio
bcarso   3/24/2011 5:41:06 PM
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Crosstalk cancellation goes way back, all the way to Blumlein, and there are many, many more recent patents (Mouri, Cooper-Bauck, etc.). I'm sure the good Professor has done some refinements focusing on specific binaural aspects, and I will have to check them out --- but the article's implication that "other loudspeaker-based 3D audio techniques" require more than two loudspeakers is quite incorrect.

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