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Neil Young: Say No to MP3s

Rich Pell
2/22/2012 05:33 PM EST

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dxevc
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re: Neil Young: Say No to MP3s
dxevc   2/23/2012 10:37:43 AM
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Not to mention the noise, both due to low SNR and due to dust, statics etc. on the vinyl itself.

kdboyce
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re: Neil Young: Say No to MP3s
kdboyce   2/23/2012 7:04:54 AM
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On the issue of preferring vinyl over anything else, I just can't bring myself to believe that a mechanical needle tracking indentations in a groove is better than a currently available A-D converter and D-A converter in terms of capturing the 'true sound' of the performance. Why anyone who really knows how vinyl recordings works could believe it is better. Now IF you really could get all the analog resolution captured in a mechanical system which was not only perfect in its recording but also playback, then maybe we have something to talk about. Meanwhile, unfortunately MP3 is here to stay for the masses until Young or someone else comes up with a better digital format that allows the storage capacity and relatively good sound the MP3 currently gives.

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