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How it was: Data communications

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Max The Magnificent
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re: How it was: Data communications
Max The Magnificent   10/1/2011 5:21:04 PM
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I was just resting my eyes!!!

Max The Magnificent
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re: How it was: Data communications
Max The Magnificent   10/1/2011 5:20:48 PM
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Huh? What? Who said that?

David Ashton
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re: How it was: Data communications
David Ashton   10/1/2011 12:28:48 AM
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Glen sorry, my reply ended up in the wrong place below....

David Ashton
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re: How it was: Data communications
David Ashton   10/1/2011 12:19:51 AM
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Oops, Max, not Maxz. Or is that the sound of him going to sleep???

David Ashton
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re: How it was: Data communications
David Ashton   10/1/2011 12:19:37 AM
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Thanks Glen for that gem of information. Certainly anyone who has ever listened to the warbling tone of a group delay test signal will never forget it....

David Ashton
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re: How it was: Data communications
David Ashton   10/1/2011 12:14:35 AM
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Hi Rene, thanks. I did put in the original text that this was a Grey-headed Albatross chick, but Maxz edited it out, so blame him. Marion was a breeding ground for 4 species of Albatross - Wandering Albatross (diomedia exulans) which are the largest albatrosses - windspan 3 metres; Grey-headed albatross (Diomedia chrysotoma) and two closeley rlated species of Sooty albatross (dark-mantled (Pheobetria fusca) and light-mantled (phoebetria palpebrata)). And no, didn't remember the latin names, I still have my bird book. The Grey-headeds used to next on a high ridge (imaginatively called Grey-headed Albatross ridge) and the chicks like the one shown in the picture occasionally used to fall or get blown off into the valley below. If we saw any that were still stong we used to haul them up the ridge again (which is what I was doing in the photo). Whether this was ever successful I am not sure - don't know if the parent birds would find the chick if it was on the wrong nest. Sorry, probably more than you wanted there....

Max The Magnificent
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re: How it was: Data communications
Max The Magnificent   9/30/2011 9:04:27 PM
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That reminds me of the joke about the man who walks into a bar with a pig under his arm... ... and the barman says "My, that certainly is a handsome looking pig you have there; where did you get him?" ... and the pig replies "I won him in a raffle!"

ReneCardenas
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re: How it was: Data communications
ReneCardenas   9/30/2011 9:01:58 PM
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David, like your story, very enlighting! But you id forget to mention something about your pet. What species?

zeeglen
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re: How it was: Data communications
zeeglen   9/30/2011 8:40:04 PM
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Good story! As for the 1004 Hz, my limited recall is that a test tone of 1000 Hz caused a problem in a T1 circuit (1.544 Mb/s in North America). Forget if this caused false sync or alarm, but the problem went away when the test frequency was shifted to 1004 Hz. Perhaps somebody with a better memory can add to this. 400 Hz was also used as a test tone in some cases, the reason being that the lower pitch was far less annoying to technicians that had to listen to it.

Max The Magnificent
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re: How it was: Data communications
Max The Magnificent   9/30/2011 7:58:25 PM
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David -- who is your friend in the picture on Marion Island? Was this a wild bird that you had surprised ... or a pet that you always carried around (just in case you needed a "conversational starter" when you went into a bar)? :-)

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