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OMG! The most amazing "must see" photos!

Clive Maxfield
10/17/2012 01:56 PM EDT

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David Ashton
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re: OMG! The most amazing "must see" photos!
David Ashton   10/17/2012 11:41:22 PM
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Kodachrome was amazing film, especially the slow but oh-so-fine-grained Kodachrome 25, I used to love that film. I reckon you'd need 25+ megapixels of digital to even come close to it. in 35mm format, let alone the 4x5" shown here. There was a link in one of the comments to the main article about how Kodak might again produce film. That would be awesome, but I can't see it happening. The other aspect to these is how many women are shown employed in the war effort. We tend to forget about that. It was the same in Britain - I seem to remember your mom was involved in something there Max?

Max The Magnificent
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re: OMG! The most amazing "must see" photos!
Max The Magnificent   10/17/2012 3:57:40 PM
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Also, I find it really sad to think that all of the folks in these images -- so young and vital at the time -- are now either on their last legs or -- more probably -- have passed away. Bummer ... my turn next ...

Max The Magnificent
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re: OMG! The most amazing "must see" photos!
Max The Magnificent   10/17/2012 3:55:34 PM
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Especially note the comments at the bottom of the main article -- these are about how the old Kodak film gave better results than modern digital cameras. Having seen these images, it's hard to disagree...

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