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Massive growth for wireless backhaul

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jgael
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re: Massive growth for wireless backhaul
jgael   12/4/2011 6:35:34 AM
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actually all engineers are welcome...not just ones with budgets.

jgael
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re: Massive growth for wireless backhaul
jgael   12/4/2011 6:34:11 AM
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This problem is solvable, but it has to come from a fundamental shift at the bottom of layer2. We've seen how far we're going to get on the 802.x economy and frankly, cable and satellite are not too scared. So we offer a near-perfect universal broadcast MAC with little to no change at 2.5 or above. If you are a radio vendor/researcher with access to developer boards where we can gain complete PHY control, then please join our EcoNode group on Linked In.

dmcghie
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re: Massive growth for wireless backhaul
dmcghie   10/18/2011 10:13:19 PM
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The PHS wireless phone system has a service area of about 100 meters from the base station. Standing on the street in Tokyo it is easy to see 2 or 3 NTT base station antennas. They are mounted on top of the NTT pay phones. Backhaul is through wired ISDN lines. These base stations are very cost effective.

Mike350
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re: Massive growth for wireless backhaul
Mike350   10/12/2011 11:12:09 PM
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Kiran, my buddies at Mobile Experts say that the report has case studies with comprehensive details on the total cost of ownership They say that the total cost is still reasonable with NLOS solutions. If this is true, the femto idea does not work (coverage solutions compete with WiFi) but a picocell/metrofemtocell can work at about half a watt to boost capacity.

Bert22306
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re: Massive growth for wireless backhaul
Bert22306   10/12/2011 8:51:22 PM
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The high cost will be refected in wireless broadband fees, which will no doubt become tied to the amount of traffic volume each customer demands, per month. I doubt there are many alternatives, if the traffic volume predictions hold true. Some minor additional spectrum assigned to two-way wireless will certainly not be the whole answer. Not when a single 4G channel will be 100 MHz wide (often aggretgated from much smaller slices).

elctrnx_lyf
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re: Massive growth for wireless backhaul
elctrnx_lyf   10/12/2011 6:27:20 PM
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is the back haul discussed in here is specific to femto cells are to the general base stations. I do nt agree with the idea of femto as they increase cost of infrastructure very high.

WKetel
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re: Massive growth for wireless backhaul
WKetel   10/12/2011 2:49:25 PM
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The unintended benefit of wireless backhaul is the fact that it may tend to reduce the likely hood of disasters taking a node off-line. Of course, hardened underground connections would be even more robust, but they might cost a lot more.

Sheetal.Pandey
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re: Massive growth for wireless backhaul
Sheetal.Pandey   10/12/2011 11:03:39 AM
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sounds interesting need to study more about it..

weeb
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re: Massive growth for wireless backhaul
weeb   10/12/2011 7:24:46 AM
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Femtos are a long way off - they are expensive little base stations, that have to coordinate with the existing macro network. No demand for them now.

Bert22306
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re: Massive growth for wireless backhaul
Bert22306   10/12/2011 1:08:19 AM
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This is an interesting topic that keeps popping up in different articles, with one emphasis or another, depending on the article. I have believed for some time that idea that femtocells are for private ownership, and use the owner's IP broadband link for backhaul, is only a transitional phenomenon. Femtocells are the natural progression of cellular architectures, whose cells have been getting smaller and smaller ever since the beginning. As far as I can tell, femtocells are the only way to get enough spectrum re-use to manage the sharply increasing demand in wireless broadband. There will be a mix of larger cells and femtocells, depending on what is expected of wireless broadband users in that general area. But varying cell sizes have always been the case, so this is really nothing new. In general, seems to me inescapable that the carriers will be deploying their own femtocells, soon enough. Otherwise, some of the higher performance features of their cell phones would be too reliant on WiFi hotspots. Why would a carrier agree to that? And, of course, cellular wireless only works because it is layered over a fancy, routed, backhaul network. That's key. The "wireless" part of cellular only covers the very shortest distances, at the outer edges. The heavy lifting is done in the backhaul. So naturally, more cells means more backhaul.

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