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Creating a Vetinari Clock Using Antique Analog Meters

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David Ashton
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Re: Analog meters
David Ashton   8/20/2014 5:48:24 PM
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@Zeeglen, rick, two good and easy solutions.  I shouldn't make statements like that before I have had my coffee :-)

zeeglen
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Re: Analog meters
zeeglen   8/20/2014 5:42:48 PM
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@Rcurl I don't think it will be difficult at all to drive a zero-center meter from a single power supply, though.

An H-pad would do the job, would take 2 bits to drive it.

Rcurl
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Vetinari clock
Rcurl   8/20/2014 5:27:50 PM
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Hmmmmm....is a Vetinari clock one that only animals can read?

Rcurl
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Sorry to have missed it
Rcurl   8/20/2014 5:26:09 PM
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I was soooo disappointed to have missed the Hamfest this year- although it sounds like you made off with all of the choice stuff before I could have gotten there anyway.

Next year I wonder if they would let me in if I ride an electric scooter with a small trailer behind!

Rcurl
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Re: Analog meters
Rcurl   8/20/2014 5:19:10 PM
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@David:  I was going to suggest a centre-zero meter (I might even have one for you if you want) but really if you're going to drive them with an MCU then you can make them do what you want anyway, and centre zero meters need + and - drive voltages which would make life difficult.

I was thinking the same thing.  I don't think it will be difficult at all to drive a zero-center meter from a single power supply, though.  Just put a big electrolytic capacitor in series with the meter movement.

To go along with it, maybe synthesize a "tick" when it flicks left and a "tock" when it flicks right.

Steve Manley
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Tick..Tock Sound
Steve Manley   8/20/2014 4:43:03 PM
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@Max: This is an interesting idea:

Personally I'd go with keeping it simple and make it so the dials are easy to read but make the dial look aged.

The sound selection for the tick..tock would depend on the responsiveness of the selected meter. A slow response might work better with the sound of a larger clock while a faster response might work better with that of a smaller clock or watch.  

Max The Magnificent
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Re: Analog meters
Max The Magnificent   8/20/2014 4:36:58 PM
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@David: ...270 degree meters [...] any of those in your stash?

I think there are a couple, but the ones I'm using for Mins and Secs are a semi-matched pair (same manufacturer and same look and feel - -just one was originally intended for volt sand one for current -- but I'll be replacing the legends on the faceplates anyway).

The ones I have have a 90 degree movement -- and that will be OK for 6 major marks with 10 smaller ones between them.

 

David Ashton
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Re: Analog meters
David Ashton   8/20/2014 4:28:48 PM
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@Max...seconds...you used to be able to get 270 degree meters which would be nice for that....any of those in your stash?  They were common in car gauges.



Max The Magnificent
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Re: Chimes
Max The Magnificent   8/20/2014 4:27:07 PM
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@David: ....or get one of those old "ding-dong" doorbells and fire it up on the hour....

I'm thinking more like on the hour you hear the sound of creaky clockwork turning, and things sliding and graunching and suchlike -- something that goes on and on -- then cumulates in a soft, sweet "ping"

Max The Magnificent
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Re: Analog meters
Max The Magnificent   8/20/2014 4:25:18 PM
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@David: Are you going to make custom scales for them?

Bet your booty -- it's hard to tell the time when the big dial's faceplate presents values in Ohms and the two medium meters show volts and amps LOL -- watch for my column tomorrow on this...

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