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How to Fly Without Catching the Dreaded Lurgy?

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zeeglen
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Re: My Apologies
zeeglen   9/3/2014 1:13:46 AM
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@David "GHutfoll" with emphasis on the GH

Alright!  Another new expletive for my ever-growing vocabulary.  Thanks!

David Ashton
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Re: My Apologies
David Ashton   9/2/2014 8:37:16 PM
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@Antedeluvian....Afrikaans is often very expressive like that.  For example "Gatvol" (for non-South African readers, pronounced "GHutfoll" with emphasis on the GH) is much more experssive than "P155ed off" :-)

liverdonor
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Sorry to hear...
liverdonor   9/2/2014 8:06:00 PM
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...that you're feeling poorly.

My colleagues and I have a strategy when we travel, as suggested by a physician friend who travels extensively (this applies especially to long and/or oversease flights):
  1. Hydrate, but stay isotonic. This strategy is based on the idea that if you keep yourself from drying out and also keep the pH in your UT slightly elevated, you avoid allowing in infections by circulating clean fluid through your system slowly but evenly. It is important to stay isotonic, though, which means you occasionally need electrolyte replenishment as well as merely H2O. Consume about 500cc per hour, and make sure at least 125cc of that are electrolyte-heavy but low-acidity (Gatorade, Vitamin Water, etc.) Also, by keeping your mucosal membranes from drying out, you can smother-out quite a few invasive bacteria and sweep-away many virii which would try to enter your body through exposed mucosal membranes that dry out.
  2. Immune-system hyperboost immediately before and while in flight. Take 250mg Vit C and as much Zn as you can stand (it upsets some people's stomach, so determine this before you go). While in-flight, take another dose. If you have used Echinacea and found it helps you (it doesn't help everyone), you can take that, too.
  3. Finally (and this depends on where your destination is), eat some yogurt or take some pro-biotic capsules. The other primary way that systemic infections invade is via the gut. If you flood your gut with friendly bacteria, they help not only by keeping the pH elevated so that virii find a hostile environment, they also keep invading bacteria at bay which is great if you're travelling somewhere that might have food with different fauna in it than what you're used to.
  4. Get lots of rest if possible before and after your flight. It is almost impossible to overstate the value of being well-rested when going on a long flight - that boosts your immune response, too.

Best of luck and get well soon, Max!

antedeluvian
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Re: My Apologies
antedeluvian   9/2/2014 7:38:43 PM
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David

On a TAP flight from Lisbon to Harare once we were behind a guy who would cough up phlegm every couple of minutes into his handkerchief

Going back to an earlier conversation of ours where we discussed Afrikaans that didn't quite translate into English. I remember the signs in the trains which read in Afrikaans "Moenie Spoeg Nie" which when spoken is rather onomatopoeic. The English said- "Do Not Expectorate".

David Ashton
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Lurgi....
David Ashton   9/2/2014 7:13:28 PM
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Once while travelling via Ethiopia I got Dysentery.  That was NOT fun.

Duane Benson
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Re: Real-time health checks
Duane Benson   9/2/2014 6:42:51 PM
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I have about an 80% hit rate, as in I get sick on 80% of my trips. I don;t think it's always on the flight though. Spending a few days in an exhibit hall with thousands of people leads to a lot of germ attack opportunities too.

Susan Rambo
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Re: Real-time health checks
Susan Rambo   9/2/2014 6:30:39 PM
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Maybe there can be "quarantine" seats on the plane. First class, business class, coach and quarantine. Quarantine is on the wing. (It can't be in the wing because isn't that where they store the fuel?)

David Ashton
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Re: My Apologies
David Ashton   9/2/2014 6:25:21 PM
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On a TAP flight from Lisbon to Harare once we were behind a guy who would cough up phlegm every couple of minutes into his handkerchief, then open it up to see what he had brought up.   Yuuuuuck.....

David Ashton
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Re: Blowing a Tuba
David Ashton   9/2/2014 6:23:58 PM
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@Max as luck would have it I listened to that Goon show only a week ago.  I can't remember laughing so much for a long time (well not since I watched "Fawlty Towers" the week before, anyway).  The Goons are brilliant, I am so glad my folks introduced me to them.    nnnnNNNNN-Yakkabool......

zeeglen
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Re: My Apologies
zeeglen   9/2/2014 4:53:29 PM
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@Max I'm certainly not thinking happy thoughts with regard to the parents of that little girl

Wonder how many others from that flight are also in as miserable a state?

One (of many) things that impressed me on some visits to Toyko a few years back were that riders on the commuter trains would wear surgical masks if they had a cough - they did this out of respect for others if they thought they might be contagious.

It might work the other way around too - keep a surgical mask in your carry-on next time you have to share a plane with a hacker (the wheezing and coughing type, not the software type) and wear it.  Or take two along, and offer one to the germ-spreader.

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