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Hypnotically Captivating Chronographs

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Max The Magnificent
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Re: Continuity Seekers
Max The Magnificent   2/6/2017 4:29:17 PM
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@Ron: Max most of our ancestors lived in caves...

A cave? Your ancestors were lucky. My ancestors used to dream of a cave, but they couldn't even afford a second-hand one.

perl_geek
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Lines and circles
perl_geek   2/6/2017 2:46:42 PM
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There are plenty of circular huts and other structures in human history. Anywhere large trees are involved, especially horizontally, rectangular floor plans are probably much easier to achieve. Furniture tends to fit better in rectangles. In the case of stone structures, it probably depends on the size of the rocks available locally. There are circular Neolithic stone buildings in the Orkneys, but I wouldn't be surprised if aerodynamics came into play there. (It's windy there.)

As far as clocks and dials are concerned, circular clock-faces are surely a technological Cheshire Cat carrying over the shape of sundials? The direction of hand movement certainly does.

I believe our peripheral vision is especially acute at discriminating between angles, more so than distances. Despite that, of course, auto designers will periodically inflict linear speedometers on their customers. (Then there are digital ones, which were a dumb idea when Herbert Austin put them in the Austin 7, and haven't become any smarter since.)

Digital displays make more sense on things like voltmeters because:

a) You want a number, and

b) You have time to look at the meter face-on.

 

Ron Neale
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Re: Continuity Seekers
Ron Neale   2/6/2017 12:12:27 PM
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Max most of our ancestors lived in caves, circular in the form of natural arches. History shows they could not wait to get out of them into the "little boxes made of ticky tacky"

betajet
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"Curves Ahead"
betajet   2/6/2017 11:50:28 AM
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Rama asked: What makes us seek curvy things?

Perhaps it was natural selection?



Ralph Steiner, Gypsy: On the Road (Curves Ahead), 1950, The Cleveland Museum of Art

Max The Magnificent
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Re: Continuity Seekers
Max The Magnificent   2/6/2017 10:00:46 AM
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@Rama: ...What makes us like circular or elliptical shapes more than geometric shapes with sharp corners?...

I don't know -- but it's interesting when you come to think about it that the places we live are almost universally based on rooms with sharp edges -- I've seen a few buildings on TV programs that are based on curves, and they look sort of weird, but maybe that's because they are so rare -- it would be interesting to live in one and see if it makes you feel any different.

betajet
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Re: Continuity Seekers
betajet   2/5/2017 11:38:01 AM
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Rama asked: What makes us like circular or elliptical shapes more than geometric shapes with sharp corners?

For clocks, it's most likely similarity to the human face.  Indeed, the surface of a clock is called its "face" and the old-fashioned expression "clean your clock" means to punch someone in the face.



Rama Murthy
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Continuity Seekers
Rama Murthy   2/3/2017 10:48:51 PM
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Max, These clock and audio level displays are superb. What makes us like circular or elliptical shapes more than geometric shapes with sharp corners? Do we have some differentiator built in in vision or is it because sharp corners hurt,that we tend to like curves?Earlier NEC used to offer VFD(Vacuum Fluorescent displays) and their best was analog clock VFD display. Analog automotive dashboards appeal most and we all like a well lit dashboard at night.What makes us seek curvy things? I should say that this is one of the best analog clock displays. No manufacturer has so far come out with a LED pointer analog clock display, a table top version like the alarm clock ones we had thirty years ago, with keying springs.-a little bigger than the VFD clock displays of NEC. You score 100 points on this. NEC had elliptcal VFD display while later versions like Futaba and Zheziang BOE had only circular ones.

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