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What's a Good Name for a Future Engineer?

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Rcurl
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Apologies to John Cleese
Rcurl   2/16/2017 12:16:39 PM
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The first name that came to mind that is appropriate for an Engineer is "Fawlty".

Max The Magnificent
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Re: Apologies to John Cleese
Max The Magnificent   2/16/2017 1:15:17 PM
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@Rcurl: The first name that came to mind that is appropriate for an Engineer is "Fawlty".

"Fawlty Taylor"? Nooooo

But what about "Sparky Taylor"?

antedeluvian
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Optimistic???
antedeluvian   2/16/2017 12:18:24 PM
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Given the current state of the world- Nero (who fiddled while Rome burned)

 

And CONGRATULATIONS, Adam.

Max The Magnificent
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Re: Optimistic???
Max The Magnificent   2/16/2017 1:27:44 PM
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@Antedeluvian: Given the current state of the world- Nero (who fiddled while Rome burned)

We don't want anything with negative connotations. Also it has to be something that works with Adam's surname -- Nero Taylor doesn't have the necessary "Oomph".

These days I think it's good to "stand proud in the crowd" a bit, and having a good name is a good start. How about the first names shown in bold below (combine them with Taylor and let them roll off your tongue):

Gustave (Eiffel), Alexander (Graham Bell), Leonardo (da Vinci), Elija (McCoy), Rudolf (Diesel), Godfrey (Hounsfield), Aurel (Stodola), Franklin (Chang Diaz).

Tht right names are out there somewhere ... we just have to find them.

 

perl_geek
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Androgyny?
perl_geek   2/16/2017 2:31:55 PM
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To simplify the decision process, how about something androgynous? Taylor would work; that way the order of names doesn't matter either. TT's not too bad for initials, just don't add a middle name beginning with a vowel.

Depending on the ETA, Summer would be another possibility, (even if nominative determinism might point to a more mathematical career).

Max The Magnificent
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Re: Androgyny?
Max The Magnificent   2/16/2017 2:41:22 PM
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@perl_geek: ...how about something androgynous?...

Hmm, I don't know, on the one hand, "Something Androgynous Taylor" would certainly stand out in the crowd -- and it has to be admitted that it would work equally well (or not) for a boy or a girl, but the initials spell "Sat," which would be a silly nickname ... I fear we will have to carry on looking...

David Ashton
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Re: Androgyny?
David Ashton   2/16/2017 2:55:07 PM
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You've covered a good point here Max.... initials that spell something will invariably lead to them being used as a nickname.  And names will inevitably be shortened, or even lengthened, so take that into account as well.

You could go the Johnny Cash route and (if it's a boy) name it Sue....

 

elizabethsimon
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Women's names
elizabethsimon   2/16/2017 3:49:40 PM
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Edith (Clarke)

Grace (Hopper)

Irmgard (Flugge-Lotz)

Lise (Meitner)

Hedy (Lamarr)

Beulah Louise (Henry)

Helen (Blanchard)

Marie (Curie)

Beatrice (Hicks)

 

antedeluvian
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Re: Women's names
antedeluvian   2/16/2017 3:57:48 PM
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Don't forget

Ada (Lovelace)

Caroline (Herschel)

 or  Katherine (Johnson), Dorothy (Vaughan), and Mary (Jackson), all mentioned in "Hidden Figures"

Max The Magnificent
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Re: Women's names
Max The Magnificent   2/16/2017 4:20:40 PM
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@Antedeluvian: ...all mentioned in "Hidden Figures"

I haven't see that film yet, but it's right up there at the top of my "want to see" list -- have you seen it? If so, what did you think?


Max The Magnificent
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Re: Women's names
Max The Magnificent   2/16/2017 4:16:39 PM
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@Elizabeth: I'm a huge fan of all these lady engineers, but you have to think how the name will sound (a) in the context of a modern audience and (b) when combined with the "Taylor" family name.

For example, "Edith Taylor" really doesn't "ring my bell," as it were.

Now I do like "Irmgard Taylor" ... that has a certain something about it.

 

 

 

antedeluvian
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Re: Women's names
antedeluvian   2/16/2017 4:27:28 PM
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max

really doesn't "ring my bell," as it were.

Well if you really want to saddle the kid with a name guaranteed to incite parental hatred how about "Tintinnabulation Taylor". That certainly has a ring (pun intended) to it. Could be shortened to "TinTin" which could be boy/girl and has comic-book hero overtones

 

And "Hidden Figures"- not yet seen.

Max The Magnificent
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Re: Women's names
Max The Magnificent   2/16/2017 4:38:43 PM
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@Anteleluvian: ...saddle the kid with a name guaranteed to incite parental hatred...

Oooh -- "Tiberius Tintinnabulation Taylor"

This would lend itself to the nickname "T-Cubed"

elizabethsimon
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Re: Women's names
elizabethsimon   2/17/2017 11:11:01 AM
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@ Max Now I do like "Irmgard Taylor" ... that has a certain something about it.

Now why did I think that you would choose that one...

I think "Beulah Louise Taylor" also has a certain something about it.

Of course, saddling a kid with one of these names might just turn them off to engineering completely.

 

Max The Magnificent
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Re: Women's names
Max The Magnificent   2/17/2017 11:41:25 AM
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@Elizabeth: ...I think "Beulah Louise Taylor" also has a certain something about it...

Not the least that "B-L-T" would make a great nickname

tduepner
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Re: Women's names
tduepner   2/17/2017 2:05:00 PM
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Add Rosalind Franklin to the list for women.  It has the advantage that nicknames will be easy: Rose or Linda and the initials would be RT!  Realtime!  Children are nothing if not real time!

Max The Magnificent
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3-Letter Nicknames
Max The Magnificent   2/17/2017 11:54:26 AM
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With regard to Elizabeth Simon's suggestion of "Beulah Louise Taylor," which woudl lend itself to the nickname "B-L-T" -- yesterday evening I did a search of 3-letter words ending in 'T' and came up with the following list:

Act, Aft, Ait, Alt, Ant, Apt, Art, Att, Bat, Bet, Bit, Bot,But, Cat, Cot, Cut, Dit, Dot, Eat, Eft, Fat, Fet, Fit, Gat, Get, Git, Got, Gut, Hat, Het, Hit, Hot, Hut, Jet, Jot, Jut, Kat, Kit, Lat, Let, Lit, Lot, Mat, Met, Mot, Mut, Net, Nit, Not, Nut, Oat, Oft, Oot, Opt, Ort, Out, Pat, Pet, Pht, Pit, Pot, Pst, Put, Qat, Rat, Ret, Rot, Rut, Sat, Set, Sit, Sot, Tat, Tet, Tit, Tot, Tut, Vat, Vet, Wat, Wet, Wit, Wot, Yet, Zit

So a name like "Jebediah Eujene Talyor" would lend itself to a nickname of "Jet," which has a zippy sound to it, but we should probably stay away from unfortunate offerings like "Zebediah Isambard Talyor"

UltrasonicBill
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Engineer Names
UltrasonicBill   2/17/2017 12:23:50 PM
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Ceres Taylor, pronounced with a soft C, of course. Especially effective in last name first listings.

Max The Magnificent
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Re: Engineer Names
Max The Magnificent   2/17/2017 12:40:49 PM
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@UltrasonicBill: Ceres Taylor, pronounced with a soft C, of course...

If we are opting for no middle name, then Eustace Taylor would lend itself to an "E-T" nickname...

tb100
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tb100   2/17/2017 1:25:10 PM
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I was once near this kids play area and I heard a mother yell out "Galileo!  Galileo!  Come on, it's time to go home!"

I thought that was very cool but also very funny, which I guess is the trade off for many of these suggestions.

Max The Magnificent
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Re: Name
Max The Magnificent   2/17/2017 2:28:42 PM
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@tb100: ...I heard a mother yell out "Galileo!  Galileo!  Come on, it's time to go home!"...

As soon as she shouted "Galileo!  Galileo!" I would have found it hard to restrain myself from responding: "Galileo Figaro"

Perhaps followed by: "Scaramouche, Scaramouche, will you do the Fandango? Thunderbolt and lightning, Very, very frightening me."

At which point I would expect the whole park to join in (by which, of course, I men the people in the park)

David Ashton
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Re: Name
David Ashton   2/17/2017 10:36:03 PM
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@Max... "As soon as she shouted "Galileo!  Galileo!" I would have found it hard to restrain myself from responding: "Galileo Figaro""

You should be careful doing that sort of thing:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fqymcJRSbxI

Guzbikes
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A few quick suggestions
Guzbikes   2/17/2017 1:37:18 PM
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My wife and I (who is also an engineer) had a daughter 3 weeks ago. We named her Ada!

And there is an Isambard connection there too. There's a great steampunk web comic and graphic novel: Lovelace & Babbage. Isambard Kingdom Brunel shows up in part 3 of this one: http://sydneypadua.com/2dgoggles/lovelace-and-babbage-vs-the-economy/ and in a few of the others in the book.

I also saw a mention of the initials JET in the comments above. I have a friend (who was a pilot) that actually named his son Jet.

Max The Magnificent
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Re: A few quick suggestions
Max The Magnificent   2/17/2017 2:30:20 PM
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@Guzbikes: My wife and I (who is also an engineer) had a daughter 3 weeks ago. We named her Ada!...

CONGRATULATIONS!!!

I love Steampunk -- I will look out those graphic novels -- thansk for sharing

SuperSkeptic
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The most appropriate...,
SuperSkeptic   2/17/2017 2:56:48 PM
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...and unisex, to boot, is MURPHY. Hard to believe no one came with that.

Max The Magnificent
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Re: The most appropriate...,
Max The Magnificent   2/17/2017 3:01:37 PM
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@SuperSkeptic: ...and unisex, to boot...

Good one -- I hadn't thought of that -- Murphy Taylor (it's the law!)

SuperSkeptic
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Re: The most appropriate...,
SuperSkeptic   2/17/2017 4:29:10 PM
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@max: BTW this is one of my alter egos. Mark Rackin here. I am out of house for a couple of days waiting for my refinished floors to be,ready to be trod upon, and have furniture moved back in place. Only PW I remembered was for this account!

Max The Magnificent
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Re: The most appropriate...,
Max The Magnificent   2/17/2017 4:59:04 PM
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@SuperSkeptic: ...this is one of my alter egos. Mark Rackin here....

Well, you could have knocked me over with a fish-wife!

perl_geek
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Belated Inspiration
perl_geek   2/18/2017 1:15:58 PM
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The perfect name in this case would be "Tinker".

Behavioural prescription, alliterative initials, great combination with the surname, and has a feminine form, "Tinka". :-)*

Max The Magnificent
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Re: Belated Inspiration
Max The Magnificent   2/21/2017 12:09:41 PM
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@perl_geek: The perfect name in this case would be "Tinker"...

Oooh -- Tinker Taylor -- I like it!!!

 

TonyTib
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Re: Belated Inspiration -- for the wrong field
TonyTib   2/21/2017 12:59:45 PM
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Tinker Taylor is perfect for a boy destined to be a spy, NOT an engineer

Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy

antedeluvian
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Re: Belated Inspiration -- for the wrong field
antedeluvian   2/21/2017 1:09:56 PM
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Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy

Actually "Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy" is the title of a Le Carre book. I believe he co-copted it from the nursery rhyme

Tinker, Tailor,
Soldier, Sailor,
Rich Man, Poor Man,
Beggar Man, Thief.

TonyTib
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Re: Belated Inspiration -- for the wrong field
TonyTib   2/21/2017 1:44:27 PM
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Yes, and it's a book (and and mini-series and movie) about espionage

Although, of course, for real world spying engineering can be quite important

David Ashton
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Re: Belated Inspiration -- for the wrong field
David Ashton   2/21/2017 4:27:41 PM
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@Antedeluvian....

Tinker, Tailor,
Soldier, Sailor,
Rich Man, Poor Man,
Beggar Man, Thief.

Well that give a few career possibilities, none of them engineering-related though.

Then again, Adam could call his new bub "Swift" and hope he/she becomes a pop star.  

That would be way more lucrative than being an engineer.....

 

 

Max The Magnificent
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Re: Belated Inspiration -- for the wrong field
Max The Magnificent   2/21/2017 4:56:30 PM
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@David: ...Then again, Adam could call his new bub "Swift" and hope he/she becomes a pop star...

Swift Taylor? Is this a play on Tom Swift? How about Tom Swift Taylor or Swift Tom Taylor?

      That would be way more lucrative than being an engineer.....

Speaking of which, I can't believe that you haven't offered any input to my Hurray for Engineers column

 

David Ashton
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Re: Belated Inspiration -- for the wrong field
David Ashton   2/21/2017 5:40:08 PM
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@Max....Tom Swift Taylor does have a nice ring to it.

> Speaking of which, I can't believe that you haven't offered any input to my Hurray for Engineers column

Done and dusted.  I can't believe I was the first commenter.  Comes from living down under I suppose in one of the first time zones....

Max The Magnificent
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Re: Belated Inspiration -- for the wrong field
Max The Magnificent   2/21/2017 6:15:08 PM
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@David: ...Comes from living down under...

How is life on the Unfinished Continent? I've long wanted to visit -- so many places to see -- I'd live to re-create Bill Bryson's journey from his book "In a Sunburned Country" 

David Ashton
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Re: Belated Inspiration -- for the wrong field
David Ashton   2/21/2017 7:02:08 PM
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@Max: "How is life on the Unfinished Continent?"

Well this summer nearly finished me - since Xmas we have been more than usually hot, mostly in mid-30's (that's C, 100 F for you philistines) and some high 30's.  A week or so I went to Tasmania (that's the little island down the bottom right) and the maximum we got there was 27 (80F).  I wanna go live there.  I don't mind the cold but heat like that gets me down.  There is a lot to see here but there's a lot of stupidity here too - our parliament on TV often looks like an unsupervised kindergarten class.  Bill Bryson gave a very fair treatment I think, warts and all as they say.

Max The Magnificent
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Re: Belated Inspiration -- for the wrong field
Max The Magnificent   2/22/2017 10:17:02 AM
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@David: ...I don't mind the cold but heat like that gets me down...

And this from a man who spent his formative years in Africa

Max The Magnificent
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Re: Belated Inspiration -- for the wrong field
Max The Magnificent   2/22/2017 10:20:38 AM
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@David: ....our parliament on TV often looks like an unsupervised kindergarten class...

You think you've got it bad... you should see what it's like over here in the USA these days... I'm scared to turn my TV on to discover the Disaster du Jour (we consider ourselves lucky if there's only one :-)

Rcurl
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Re: Belated Inspiration
Rcurl   2/22/2017 10:22:47 AM
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Don't know why I didn't think of this earlier, but I think Edison would be a fine first name - aside from the probability that his friends will call him "E.T."

perl_geek
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Re: Belated Inspiration
perl_geek   2/22/2017 1:39:38 PM
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Now we can hijack the thread for an "Edison vs Tesla" flamewar. :-)*

Max The Magnificent
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Re: Belated Inspiration
Max The Magnificent   2/22/2017 3:12:23 PM
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@perl_geek: ...an "Edison vs Tesla" flamewar..

Would that be the same Edison that didn't create the world's first incandescent bulb and who missed the chance to invent the vacuum tube 21 years before British electrical engineer and physicist John Ambrose Fleming created the vacuum tube diode?

I think I've heard of him LOL

traneus
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Vacuum tube patents
traneus   2/28/2017 11:53:28 AM
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Edison did invent the vacuum tube diode, and knew it, but had no use for it!

Here are four key U.S. patents on the early vacuum tube:

00,307,031 issued 1884, Thomas Edison, "vacuous" diode used as voltmeter (plate current depended on filament voltage). Edison was aware of the polarity-sensitive property of his diode, but worked with direct current only, so had no use for a rectifier.

00,803,684 issued 1905, Reginald Fleming, vacuum diode rectifier for radio.

00,879,532 issued 1908, Lee DeForest, gassy triode detector for radio. DeForest specified that a "conducting gaseous medium" was necessary for operation. DeForest used a capacitor in series with the grid to block DC grid current, and let the gas determine the grid voltage.

01,558,436 issued 1925, Irving Langmuir of General Electric, vacuum triode detector and oscillator for radio. Langmuir patented the vacuum (so has a patent on the absence of gas). Langmuir filed in 1913, but issuance of this patent was delayed until eight months after DeForest's patent expired, so triode vacuum tubes were under patent until 1942.

Harold D. Arnold of AT&T independently invented the triode vacuum tube for telephone use, but I do not have his patent number.

Remember that a major purpose of the U.S. Patent Office is the creation of expired utility patents as an open record of technological how-to. The limited-term patent monopoly is merely a means to this end.

Max The Magnificent
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Re: Vacuum tube patents
Max The Magnificent   2/28/2017 1:38:48 PM
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@Traneus Rex: Edison did invent the vacuum tube diode, and knew it, but had no use for it!...

Wasn't it Edison's assistant, William Hammer, who discovered that electrons flowed through the vacuum of an incandescent bulb -- and thsi effect subsequently became known as the Edison Effect?

traneus
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Edison effect
traneus   2/28/2017 8:15:05 PM
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Thanks for the note about Edison's assistant William Hammer. My statement was based on the description in Edison's 1884 U.S. Patent 00,307,031, which shows that Edison at least somewhat understood the rectifying effect when he wrote the description. Of course, he would have learned that from Hammer.

Edison states that "a portion of the current will, when the lamp is in operation, pass through the shunt-circuit thus formed {the diode plate circuit}, which shunt includes a portion of the vacuous space within the lamp", without mentioning the yet-to-be-discovered electron.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thermionic_emission states that the Edmond Becquerel discovered the effect in 1853, and that Frederick Guthrie discovered the same effect in air in 1873.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/J._J._Thomson states that Thomson discovered the electron in 1897, and has a description of his experiments with cathode rays.

TFCSD
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What's a Good Name for a Future Engineer?
TFCSD   2/27/2017 11:36:36 PM
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Unqualified worker? ;-)

Max The Magnificent
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Re: What's a Good Name for a Future Engineer?
Max The Magnificent   2/28/2017 10:25:49 AM
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@TFCSD: Unqualified worker?

I was feeling quite cheerful this morning -- then I read your comment -- now I'm feeling sad :-(

TFCSD
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Re: What's a Good Name for a Future Engineer?
TFCSD   2/28/2017 7:43:09 PM
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@ Max

You're right. It should be unskilled applicant. "Worker" implies skills and past experience while "future" implies no skills and no experience. Shades of Catbert. ;-)

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