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DNA Test Reveals How Well You're Aging

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David Ashton
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Naaah.....
David Ashton   12/1/2016 5:42:39 PM
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I guess it's like getting the sex of your unborn child.  Some people just gotta know, other's are happy to leave it till the event.  I can't see them reliably getting you back on track if you're older than your actual age (as you say, warning bells...) so why worry.  I wouldn't get it done.  But fascinating stuff.  I'd previously read about cells not regenerating as well when you get old (that's why you get old) but this puts it all in focus as to what exactly is happening.

antedeluvian
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Maybe, soon
antedeluvian   12/1/2016 7:41:01 PM
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As I toy with the question of retirement and sufficiency of funds, the first question is how long will you live? I am tempted to go with this test if only the hype wasn't so overdone. As it is I am considering 23andMe to se if there any genetic concern.

Clive
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Re: Naaah.....
Clive"Max"Maxfield   12/2/2016 3:32:39 PM
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@David: ...this puts it all in focus as to what exactly is happening.

I find this stuff incredibly interesting -- I've learned a lot from the Genome book referenced in my blog -- one aspect of cancer is that it reactivates the genes that create the telomerase that adds TTAGGG sequences onto the ends of the telomeres, thereby allowing the cancer cells to keep on replicating furiously.

The point is that, at some stage, we might know enough to be able to lengthen our telomeres without killing ourselves LOL

Clive
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Immune to viral attacks
Clive"Max"Maxfield   12/2/2016 3:36:03 PM
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In Stephen King's book, The Stand, a military virus gets out that has a 99.9% mortality rate -- just a few folks (including our heros) are immune.

In the Genome book referenced in my column I discovered that ~1 in 10,000,000 people have a gene mutation that makes them practically immune to every virus we know.

Unfortunately, these folks can have other problems, but this certainly makes you think...

Clive
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Re: Maybe, soon
Clive"Max"Maxfield   12/2/2016 3:39:02 PM
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@Antedeluvian: ...As it is I am considering 23andMe to se if there any genetic concern...

As you know, I took the Ancestory.com test, but that was to determine my origins, not to find out if there were any genetic concerns -- I'd be very interested to hear your experiences if you do take the 23andMe test (I think it also tells you how much Neanderthal DNA you have).

betajet
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Re: Maybe, soon
betajet   12/2/2016 4:12:39 PM
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> the first question is how long will you live?

That's easy -- just turn your hand over and look at your Life Line.  Once there was a man who had a short Life Line, so he took out a knife and made it longer.  He immediately bled to death :-)

"There was a man who made a fortune -- it was splendid -- and he died the day he was to go and spend it."

[Excerpt from memory, "Hope for the Best, Expect the Worse", The Twelve Chairs (1970), music by Johannes Brahms, lyrics by Mel Brooks]

 

 

 

betajet
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Habe mortem prae oculis
betajet   12/2/2016 4:30:01 PM
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Henny Youngman: "Doctor gave a man six months to live... Couldn't pay his bill... Gave him another six months to live."

Perhaps its best not to know.  If I knew I had a whole lot of time left, I'd probably procrastinate more than I do already.  If I knew I had only a little time left, I'd agonize over how to spend the time instead of enjoying it.

So I think I should live according to the Latin phrase habe mortem prae oculis: "[always] have death before your eyes", i.e., live as if you could die at any moment. Naughty French seminarians discovered that the phrase sounds almost exactly the same as (pardon my French) Abbé mort en pré au cul lis, which means "Abbot, dead in the field, with a lily up his ass". Here's an illustration. My retired art historian father shared this wonderful tidbit with me.

Max The Magnificent
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Re: Habe mortem prae oculis
Max The Magnificent   12/2/2016 4:34:23 PM
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@betajet: ...Naughty French seminarians discovered that the phrase sounds almost exactly the same as Abbé mort en pré au cul lis, which means "Abbot, dead in the field, with a lily up his ass"...

Oh, those silly French seminarians -- but that's the French for you LOL

betajet
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Re: Habe mortem prae oculis
betajet   12/2/2016 4:38:30 PM
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Hey Max!  I'm looking forward to seeing you next week chez ESC.  I'll be the guy with the lily...

Crusty1
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Rate Determining Step
Crusty1   12/2/2016 4:41:55 PM
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Old age takes me back to the days when I was learning Chemistry and Bio_Chemistery and I was shown that all reactions and eevn electronics have a "rate dettrmining step".

Well old age and death is a type of rate determining step as it all comes down to which vital bit fails first. Unfortunatly it's not quite as simple as this when you think about it, as some failures may not stop life but severly inhibit the enjoyment of life.

So I live life to the full, in the best possible way I know. I have stopped worrying about tomorrow, as wondering whats bad around the corner is just going to make me miserable.

This may be a Crusty quote for posterity.

Happy Christmas and New Year one and all.

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