Breaking News
Maxís Cool Beans

DNA Test Reveals How Well You're Aging

NO RATINGS
1 saves
View Comments: Threaded | Newest First | Oldest First
David Ashton
User Rank
Author
Naaah.....
David Ashton   12/1/2016 5:42:39 PM
NO RATINGS
I guess it's like getting the sex of your unborn child.  Some people just gotta know, other's are happy to leave it till the event.  I can't see them reliably getting you back on track if you're older than your actual age (as you say, warning bells...) so why worry.  I wouldn't get it done.  But fascinating stuff.  I'd previously read about cells not regenerating as well when you get old (that's why you get old) but this puts it all in focus as to what exactly is happening.

Clive
User Rank
Author
Re: Naaah.....
Clive"Max"Maxfield   12/2/2016 3:32:39 PM
NO RATINGS
@David: ...this puts it all in focus as to what exactly is happening.

I find this stuff incredibly interesting -- I've learned a lot from the Genome book referenced in my blog -- one aspect of cancer is that it reactivates the genes that create the telomerase that adds TTAGGG sequences onto the ends of the telomeres, thereby allowing the cancer cells to keep on replicating furiously.

The point is that, at some stage, we might know enough to be able to lengthen our telomeres without killing ourselves LOL

antedeluvian
User Rank
Author
Maybe, soon
antedeluvian   12/1/2016 7:41:01 PM
NO RATINGS
As I toy with the question of retirement and sufficiency of funds, the first question is how long will you live? I am tempted to go with this test if only the hype wasn't so overdone. As it is I am considering 23andMe to se if there any genetic concern.

Clive
User Rank
Author
Re: Maybe, soon
Clive"Max"Maxfield   12/2/2016 3:39:02 PM
NO RATINGS
@Antedeluvian: ...As it is I am considering 23andMe to se if there any genetic concern...

As you know, I took the Ancestory.com test, but that was to determine my origins, not to find out if there were any genetic concerns -- I'd be very interested to hear your experiences if you do take the 23andMe test (I think it also tells you how much Neanderthal DNA you have).

betajet
User Rank
Author
Re: Maybe, soon
betajet   12/2/2016 4:12:39 PM
NO RATINGS
> the first question is how long will you live?

That's easy -- just turn your hand over and look at your Life Line.  Once there was a man who had a short Life Line, so he took out a knife and made it longer.  He immediately bled to death :-)

"There was a man who made a fortune -- it was splendid -- and he died the day he was to go and spend it."

[Excerpt from memory, "Hope for the Best, Expect the Worse", The Twelve Chairs (1970), music by Johannes Brahms, lyrics by Mel Brooks]

 

 

 

Crusty1
User Rank
Author
Rate Determining Step
Crusty1   12/2/2016 4:41:55 PM
NO RATINGS
Old age takes me back to the days when I was learning Chemistry and Bio_Chemistery and I was shown that all reactions and eevn electronics have a "rate dettrmining step".

Well old age and death is a type of rate determining step as it all comes down to which vital bit fails first. Unfortunatly it's not quite as simple as this when you think about it, as some failures may not stop life but severly inhibit the enjoyment of life.

So I live life to the full, in the best possible way I know. I have stopped worrying about tomorrow, as wondering whats bad around the corner is just going to make me miserable.

This may be a Crusty quote for posterity.

Happy Christmas and New Year one and all.

Max The Magnificent
User Rank
Author
Re: Rate Determining Step
Max The Magnificent   12/2/2016 5:19:28 PM
NO RATINGS
@Crusty: ...So I live life to the full, in the best possible way I know...

All I know is that when we chatted on the phone a couple of years ago, you had a very youthful-sounding voice full o vim and vigour -- from a blind phone conversation I would have guessed your age at 35 to 40 -- hopefully that's good news :-)

Crusty1
User Rank
Author
Re: Rate Determining Step
Crusty1   12/2/2016 6:00:48 PM
NO RATINGS
Oh you flatterer, you know my cronological history, if I ever get it finished.

Clive
User Rank
Author
Re: Rate Determining Step
Clive"Max"Maxfield   12/2/2016 6:42:52 PM
NO RATINGS
@Crusty: Oh you flatterer, you know my cronological history, if I ever get it finished.

Cronological History, or Crustalogical History?

Clive
User Rank
Author
Immune to viral attacks
Clive"Max"Maxfield   12/2/2016 3:36:03 PM
NO RATINGS
In Stephen King's book, The Stand, a military virus gets out that has a 99.9% mortality rate -- just a few folks (including our heros) are immune.

In the Genome book referenced in my column I discovered that ~1 in 10,000,000 people have a gene mutation that makes them practically immune to every virus we know.

Unfortunately, these folks can have other problems, but this certainly makes you think...

Kevin Neilson
User Rank
Author
Re: Immune to viral attacks
Kevin Neilson   12/2/2016 6:29:12 PM
NO RATINGS
I don't think I believe that story about the mutation that makes you immune to all viruses...

I think the idea of telomeres has been oversimplified.  It's nice to say that there is this one thing you can do to stop aging, but it's probably not true.  There is no theoretical reason why aging is necessary, though.  The body is just poorly designed.  It's a digital system, but still can't copy without errors.  And all of the cells in the body are replaced every few years, but do you end up with a new system?  No, you get a cloudy lens with weak focusing muscles but brand-new cells, which is little comfort.  It's like replacing the warped boards on the side of your house with brand-new warped boards.

Evolution just doesn't favor aging that well.  There is a tradeoff between long life and time between generations.  Long life has advantages in accumulating knowledge and passing it on, but a short time between generations is much more important in evolution and swamping your competitors.  And a short time between generations means a younger age at reproduction, and when a species reproduces young, any diseases that don't manifest themselves until a later age get passed on.  If women give birth before 30, there will be no natural selection pressure on a disease that starts at 40, or any senescense that occurs after that age.

Clive
User Rank
Author
Re: Immune to viral attacks
Clive"Max"Maxfield   12/2/2016 7:04:59 PM
NO RATINGS
@kevin: I don't think I believe that story about the mutation that makes you immune to all viruses...

I think he said practically all viruses -- I just spent a lot of time skimming through the book but I didn't spot that reference again and I don't have the time to go through page-by-page -- it certainly made me sit up and think.

Clive
User Rank
Author
Re: Immune to viral attacks
Clive"Max"Maxfield   12/2/2016 7:08:42 PM
NO RATINGS
@Kevin: ...I think the idea of telomeres has been oversimplified...

I 100% agree -- I gave a very short account of this here -- the author of the Genome book also adds lots of qualifications -- there are other things that can go wrong in cells. However, he also notes that:

"...there is great variety in telomere length between different people, from about 7,000 DNA 'letters' to about 10,000 per chromosome end. And telomere length is strongly inherited, as is longevity. People from long-lived families, in which members regularly reach ninety, may have longer telomeres, that take longer to fray, than the rest of us."

betajet
User Rank
Author
Habe mortem prae oculis
betajet   12/2/2016 4:30:01 PM
NO RATINGS

Henny Youngman: "Doctor gave a man six months to live... Couldn't pay his bill... Gave him another six months to live."

Perhaps its best not to know.  If I knew I had a whole lot of time left, I'd probably procrastinate more than I do already.  If I knew I had only a little time left, I'd agonize over how to spend the time instead of enjoying it.

So I think I should live according to the Latin phrase habe mortem prae oculis: "[always] have death before your eyes", i.e., live as if you could die at any moment. Naughty French seminarians discovered that the phrase sounds almost exactly the same as (pardon my French) Abbé mort en pré au cul lis, which means "Abbot, dead in the field, with a lily up his ass". Here's an illustration. My retired art historian father shared this wonderful tidbit with me.

Max The Magnificent
User Rank
Author
Re: Habe mortem prae oculis
Max The Magnificent   12/2/2016 4:34:23 PM
NO RATINGS
@betajet: ...Naughty French seminarians discovered that the phrase sounds almost exactly the same as Abbé mort en pré au cul lis, which means "Abbot, dead in the field, with a lily up his ass"...

Oh, those silly French seminarians -- but that's the French for you LOL

betajet
User Rank
Author
Re: Habe mortem prae oculis
betajet   12/2/2016 4:38:30 PM
NO RATINGS
Hey Max!  I'm looking forward to seeing you next week chez ESC.  I'll be the guy with the lily...

Max The Magnificent
User Rank
Author
Re: Habe mortem prae oculis
Max The Magnificent   12/2/2016 5:12:17 PM
NO RATINGS
@betajet: I'm looking forward to seeing you next week chez ESC.  I'll be the guy with the lily...

LOL  I'll be the one with the pruning shears :-)

jimford1
User Rank
Rookie
Pending Review
jimford1   12/5/2016 12:55:16 AM
NO RATINGS
This comment is waiting for review by our moderators.

jimford1
User Rank
Rookie
Pending Review
jimford1   12/5/2016 12:41:33 AM
NO RATINGS
This comment is waiting for review by our moderators.

jimford1
User Rank
Rookie
Pending Review
jimford1   12/5/2016 12:53:52 AM
NO RATINGS
This comment is waiting for review by our moderators.

Datasheets.com Parts Search

185 million searchable parts
(please enter a part number or hit search to begin)
Like Us on Facebook
EE Times on Twitter
EE Times Twitter Feed