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How to train your boss in the proper bug etiquette

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Salio
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re: How to train your boss in the proper bug etiquette
Salio   10/1/2010 9:16:38 PM
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I agree that you have to somehow communicate to your boss as to when to come in start bombarding you with questions that you may or may not have answers to. I mean it is annoying when you are right there about to solve the problem and you get a phone call or your boss walks up to you and asks "how is it going?". At times I wanted to say we are screwed and it is not going to happen. However, I never did that. I wish had.

tfc
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re: How to train your boss in the proper bug etiquette
tfc   9/17/2010 4:11:25 AM
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I had a boss like that (emphasis on had). After going through several more engineers after me, the company finally drove him out and the company started to make money.Some how the idea was to motivate the engineer by reminding engineers several times a day that they needed the job done and not supply the tools to do the job.

Evergreen
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re: How to train your boss in the proper bug etiquette
Evergreen   9/13/2010 2:16:52 PM
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The classic "Dilbert" boss vs employee relationship as seen from Dilbert's perspective.

WKetel
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re: How to train your boss in the proper bug etiquette
WKetel   9/11/2010 1:50:03 AM
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I have not had many bosses that I would trust to build anything that needed to be correct, so I would not put them to work doing prototypes, or even mounting T03 transistors. My standard response has been to provide a quite detailed description of where we are, and each time the boss asks, go into even more detail. On rare occasions a boss will understand, but mostly they wind up getting bored. The one exception was early in my career, while chasing down a hardware bug that turned out to be software, the vice president of sales stood about two feet behind my back for hours at a time, to help me concentrate on solving the problem. That one was funny, since it was not the analog noise bust that all of the managers had decided that it must be.

AlexKovnat
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re: How to train your boss in the proper bug etiquette
AlexKovnat   9/10/2010 11:52:13 AM
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Perhaps another part of bug etiquette is for a technician to let his or her superiors know, every hour or so, how things are going. After all, how does the boss know whether it will be just a half hour, or 24 hours, or all week, for the computer network to be operational again after a system crash?

ReneCardenas
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re: How to train your boss in the proper bug etiquette
ReneCardenas   9/6/2010 1:03:44 PM
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Like the story very much, this reminds me of the time that we put the boss any time he came to our lab, boing mechanical labor that was part of putting together beta units. So he knew that price he had to pay in case he dare to come to the lab, during peak time of development.

ylshih
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re: How to train your boss in the proper bug etiquette
ylshih   9/4/2010 11:42:03 PM
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Good story. That reminds me of the auto shop sign that purportedly said: Labor rate = $60/hour Labor rate while you watch = $100/hour Labor rate while you ask questions = $200/hour

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