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MIT report on women in engineering faculty

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SandunDhammika
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re: MIT report on women in engineering faculty
SandunDhammika   10/1/2012 12:36:47 AM
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Here too , down to you, in Sri Lanka. I'm personally a Open University student Engineering student and we got female ratio around 50%. I think in future this would be change. And some girls are married too,worst some students got babies, so marriage and family responsibilities are not a problem to be a good engineer. --sandun--

anne-francoise.pele
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re: MIT report on women in engineering faculty
anne-francoise.pele   7/16/2012 3:25:01 PM
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I would suggest that here is an answer to the question posed by the title: http://www.eetimes.com/electronics-news/4085714/EE-Times-Top-10-women-in-microelectronics Anne-Françoise

KB3001
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re: MIT report on women in engineering faculty
KB3001   3/6/2012 9:52:09 AM
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A recent study in the UK showed that mixed gender schools favoured boys more than girls i.e. boys tend to do better in mixed gender schools, whereas girls do better in single-gender shools. Would All-Female Engineering schools help?

collin0
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re: MIT report on women in engineering faculty
collin0   10/2/2011 4:25:34 PM
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Hi, I completely agree with you. Everyone should do what is fit for them to do whatever they are male or female.

HSchmit
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re: MIT report on women in engineering faculty
HSchmit   4/25/2011 9:15:16 PM
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The Idea-Darwinism hypothesis, and the Work-Life Balance hypothesis do not IMO hold water, at least for the number of woman students in engineering. In law, 45% of the graduating students are women. Law probably has more testosterone-filled arguments and working weekends than engineering.

Sparky Watt
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re: MIT report on women in engineering faculty
Sparky Watt   4/21/2011 9:16:45 PM
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We won't get more girls in engineering until we solve two things. Math anxiety and social pressures. I absolutely disagree that any pressure comes from within the girl. I have seen many young ladies who are very interested in the sciences. They have a good time with it and are usually better than boys the same age. They also pull out in middle school when the fear of being laughed at makes it impossible for them to accept a possibility of error, and the belief that a girl that thinks is unromantic and intimidating to the boys pressures them to give it all up for a boyfriend. By the way, I am a man, not a woman. This is observation, not partisanship.

TomAtMuse
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re: MIT report on women in engineering faculty
TomAtMuse   4/15/2011 6:29:51 AM
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This research may be of interest to readers of this article: "Choices -- not discrimination -- determine women scientists' success, researchers say" "It's an incendiary topic in academia -- the pervasive belief that women are underrepresented in science, math and engineering fields because they face sex discrimination in the interviewing, hiring, and grant and manuscript review processes. In a study published Feb. 7 in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Cornell social scientists say it's just not true." For more, see: the Feb 7 issue of the Cornell Chronicle: http://www.news.cornell.edu/stories/Feb11/WomenSci.html

muddydummy
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re: MIT report on women in engineering faculty
muddydummy   4/11/2011 3:58:45 PM
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I don't think I'm quite what you take me for. Despite being a man most of my engineering is introverted as well, meaning most of my idea creation and destruction happens within my own mind, and I'm fortunate to be in a place where I can do that. Still, what gets engineered usually has to exist in the context of something larger. And different people have different ideas on what that larger thing could/should be. That's where I see it gets competitive. I had many sisters growing up and I'm not alien to the female approach to things. It's fair to say most of the women engineers I've worked with have found me cooperative. Still engineering is a messy process. Order from chaos.

TOEKNEE0
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re: MIT report on women in engineering faculty
TOEKNEE0   4/10/2011 12:15:57 PM
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I have been getting articles etc from EE Times & planet analogue for some time and have NEVER had your problem. Perhaps you need to check your own browser and system security first

DCole
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re: MIT report on women in engineering faculty
DCole   4/9/2011 1:21:05 AM
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@muddydummy: "Good engineering is a lot of "idea Darwinism" i.e. creating a lot of ideas and then shooting them all down and then going with what survives. It seems women often take idea confrontations personally whereas men can treat it as just part of a process." Actually, it's not a matter of taking things personally. It's more a matter of many women (not all, of course) being introverted learners, vs. extroverted learners. This is certainly true of myself. I would much rather work out an idea completely in my head before presenting it to my peers. When forced, I often feel flustered at the thought of giving what I percieve as incomplete or potentially wrong information. So, the next time you are in a concept meeting throwing around ideas, don't worry that the female engineer, whose idea you just shot down, it taking it personally when she clams up. She's probably just digesting what you said and thinking through her response. In a few minutes, ask her again for her input. You may be surprised.

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