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How it was: Testing RAMs and ROMs

Clive Maxfield
9/23/2011 02:55 PM EDT

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Max The Magnificent
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re: How it was: Testing RAMs and ROMs
Max The Magnificent   9/30/2011 2:59:27 PM
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Sad to relate I do not recall any "magnetic" attraction to members of the fairer sex ... for some reason they didn't realize just how wonderful I was :-)

ReneCardenas
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re: How it was: Testing RAMs and ROMs
ReneCardenas   9/30/2011 6:23:45 AM
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Wow Max, I bet you miss the magnet feature of younger years, it must have brought so much female attention with that hair! Golden curls! LoL ;-) You have my admiration and respect, of your mature pic in contrast of the innocent look.

Max The Magnificent
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re: How it was: Testing RAMs and ROMs
Max The Magnificent   9/26/2011 2:37:48 PM
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I agree -- in this article I focused on the task of making sure you had access to the memory -- also I did add the "weasel words" saying "assuming a single device"... ... things get more complicated when you have multiple devices -- and as you say you have to know the internal architecture of the device in order to perform any in-depth stress tests ... this is a topic that I could waffle on about for hours (I could talk even longer if I knew anything about it [grin])

Max The Magnificent
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re: How it was: Testing RAMs and ROMs
Max The Magnificent   9/26/2011 2:29:43 PM
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Dang -- another opportunity missed!!!

David Ashton
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re: How it was: Testing RAMs and ROMs
David Ashton   9/24/2011 7:16:00 AM
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Think of it this way Max. You invented Dynamic RAM. You should have patented it.....

BrianBailey
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re: How it was: Testing RAMs and ROMs
BrianBailey   9/23/2011 3:40:12 PM
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Another big danger with reading back directly after writing is that you have no idea if you have one memory element or an array of them. What is to say that unwanted memory elements weren't also getting written to? This is one of those cases where knowing the architecture of the solution can help. If you know how large each chip is, you can test that each one can be accessed individually and that none of the address decoding logic is screwed up. Without this knowledge you are poking in the dark. I think this is also relevant for today. When putting together a verification plan, what should be black box and what should be white box. Independence eliminates common sources of errors, but knowledge can help speedup the process.

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