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Faster than the speed of light?

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peralta_mike
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re: Faster than the speed of light?
peralta_mike   10/4/2011 8:18:37 PM
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Speculation is fun. But to discover physical laws and take advantage of them with engineering requires we confine ourselves to laws we can experimentally confirm and explore. It also puts food on the table and is a good investment. But discovery is fun in and of itself.

Max The Magnificent
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re: Faster than the speed of light?
Max The Magnificent   10/4/2011 7:31:23 PM
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Lunchtime is certainly an illusion ... I haven't seen one for longer than I care to remember :-)

KB3001
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re: Faster than the speed of light?
KB3001   10/4/2011 7:26:57 PM
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Or may be this whole world is nothing but an illusion i.e. there is no physical world as such :-)

KB3001
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re: Faster than the speed of light?
KB3001   10/4/2011 7:22:57 PM
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Agree. The problem I have with Astrophysics is that a lot of it is based on speculation, scientific speculation granted, but a lot of it for my liking :-)

Max The Magnificent
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re: Faster than the speed of light?
Max The Magnificent   10/4/2011 6:40:38 PM
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Did you read that book "Redefining Gravity" by John Moffat? One of the things he talked about was no singularity at the Big Bang -- also two universes heading off in opposite temporal dimensions (us having one "arrow of time" and the other universe going in the opposite direction) Not that this has anything to do with anything ... I just wondered. But what if there are multiple parallel universes constantly branching -- so if you went back in time and killed your ancestor the result would be that you were in a different time stream (Ha! Take That :-)

Max The Magnificent
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re: Faster than the speed of light?
Max The Magnificent   10/4/2011 6:34:41 PM
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Aren't there experiments that "hint" that the act of observing something makes it fall out one way of the other (I'm not talking about particles vs waves or position vs speed)? I seem to recall a variety of experiments -- like forming a certain type of crystal that's not found in nature -- it take a lot of effort the first time but once someone's succeeded then others find it easy to replicate... So maybe some of the laws of physics are affected by whether or not something believes in them...

peralta_mike
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re: Faster than the speed of light?
peralta_mike   10/4/2011 6:05:48 PM
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As far as particles going back in time. Sometimes the mathematics of physics can be analyzed as backward in time and still stay consistent with the math. However, the premise of cause always happening before the effect is a foundational and logical principle of Physics. Otherwise you get into such logical and inconsistent things as you being able to go back in time and kill your father (before you were born) in which case you couldn't exist to go back in time to kill your father etc.

peralta_mike
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re: Faster than the speed of light?
peralta_mike   10/4/2011 5:59:31 PM
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The laws of Physics do not depend on what you believe or do not believe. The laws of Physics are either confirmed or refuted by experimental results. Of course sometimes new theories have to be formed due to newly (confirmed) observations that had not been observed before. But multiple confirmations are vital to avoid erratic errors that sometimes creep in due to the messiness of real experiments.

KB3001
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re: Faster than the speed of light?
KB3001   10/4/2011 2:36:37 PM
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Never accepted that nothing can travel faster than the speed of light, and never accepted the concept of dark matter either. We are on the same wavelength then Max :-)

Max The Magnificent
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re: Faster than the speed of light?
Max The Magnificent   10/4/2011 1:23:46 PM
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What about the concept that some anti-particles travel back in time? How does this affect the picture?

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