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Rescue your wet phone / camera / whatever…

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Max The Magnificent
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re: Rescue your wet phone / camera / whatever…
Max The Magnificent   4/26/2012 10:07:15 PM
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Keep us posted (of course, if you had purchased this product when you first read my blog... :-)

Evolving EE
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re: Rescue your wet phone / camera / whatever…
Evolving EE   4/26/2012 8:19:09 PM
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So what is the likelihood that about two weeks after reading this post, I drop my phone in the toilet?!?!? Well I first took the battery out and it is being left to dry for a few hours. I may end up trying this product. :-(

Evolving EE
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re: Rescue your wet phone / camera / whatever…
Evolving EE   4/12/2012 1:30:11 PM
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All the electronics I have developed and have seen developed (at a certain DOE accelerator facility I once worked) were soaked in water after fabrication. Also when I talk to the fab people at this DOE facility, they say as long as the device is not turned on while wet and allowed to completely dry, it should recover fine. I recall way back in the days working at tech companies in Hauppauge Long Island, companies cleaned PCB’s with something called Genesolve. We’d just spray it down and let it soak to get all the flux off. So it’s really no surprise to me that these devices come back to life.

ost0
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re: Rescue your wet phone / camera / whatever…
ost0   4/12/2012 6:53:13 AM
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Ok, you may "save" your freshly bathed device from sudden death, but imho it will never be like new. It will be slowly tortured to retardness unless you can get all the deposited salts and hidden humidity out. A better business idea would probably to water proof the device before you drop it in water.. Maybe by dropping it in a bucket of thin transparent latex or epoxy-like substance and let it dry? :)

RWatkins
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re: Rescue your wet phone / camera / whatever…
RWatkins   4/11/2012 11:09:26 PM
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Alright guys... We all make electronics here, and we (at least I) generally clean the flux off lab-built prototypes before testing. My process of choice is to use denatured alcohol (very non-toxic, mild fumes) to dissolve the flux, a flux brush to scrub heavy buildups, and distilled water rinse to prevent the white dust surface from flux remaining in the alcohol, with a final air or canned air dry and a gentle warming to get the hidden moisture out prior to power-up. Once you get the battery out of many electronic devices, most of the rest of what is in there has been or could have been aqueous cleaned. I have had many electronic devices go in the drink fishing and canoeing, and if I quickly get the battery out then rinse the device out with the cleanest (at least drinkable) water available and dry it, I rarely have stuff that fails to recover. The exception is, of course, salt water. The other exception is if I wait a day or two afterwards until the zebra connectors, fine pitch interconnects and flex cables, etc., are well corroded, especially in dirty lakes or rivers (less a problem in Michigan U.P. or Canada lakes and rivers, which helps since it is generally further/longer to get to where the cleanup/dryup can proceed). All of this having been said, for my trips up North, it might be worth trying something like this.

David Ashton
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re: Rescue your wet phone / camera / whatever…
David Ashton   4/10/2012 8:44:08 PM
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Pretty much what I expected. It sounds like a real handy thing to have around, though. I've been wondering where they got the name from... I would have thought "Dry-it-out" or something similar would be more appealing to buyers.... can you ask them that as well Max?

Duane Benson
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re: Rescue your wet phone / camera / whatever…
Duane Benson   4/10/2012 4:15:15 PM
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I've soaked a camera in salt water. I don't think there's much you can do once that's happened. Some electronics are pretty robust though. One of my kids dropped a Gameboy in the toilet and it lived. I removed the batteries and let dry for about a week. My other kid inadvertently sent his cell phone through the wash three times. It survived the first two wash cycles, but the keyboard didn't survive the third. I think what that says is that I really should have one or two of these Bheestie bags at home waiting for the next immersion.

IDontUseTheForumSoWhyAmIForc
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re: Rescue your wet phone / camera / whatever…
IDontUseTheForumSoWhyAmIForc   4/10/2012 2:04:58 PM
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Any dessicant will work to help remove the moisture. These guys just put it in a bag with a pretty logo. What wasn't mentioned is that this works well for fresh water only. If you manage to drop your device in salt water, then you'll have to immerse it in fresh water first (to remove the corrosive salt) before drying it out again.

Max The Magnificent
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re: Rescue your wet phone / camera / whatever…
Max The Magnificent   4/10/2012 12:55:01 PM
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I asked the guys and gals at Bheestie Bags for their input, and they responded as follows: The key to preventing damage to electronics is to remove the water completely and quickly. That's why it's always a good idea to have a BHEESTIE Bag on hand before you need it. Powering down the device, removing the battery if possible, and avoiding the temptation to peek in the bag early are all key factors when it comes to saving your device.

David Ashton
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re: Rescue your wet phone / camera / whatever…
David Ashton   4/10/2012 2:02:27 AM
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As far as I know Ipods don't have removeable batteries (and anyway the guy wouldn't have removed it before he put it in the washing machine ;-) So I reckon he was very lucky.....but it does say something for the effectiveness of the Bheestie bag at absorbing all the water quickly. One of our 2-way radios (connected permanently to the vehicle battery) that was mounted under the seat of a truck got flooded recently when the truck got stuck in a river. We opened it and the PCB was a mess - you wouldn't even think of trying to fix it.

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