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To infinity and beyond: NASA's Orion spacecraft

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docdivakar
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re: To infinity and beyond: NASA's Orion spacecraft
docdivakar   5/11/2012 6:26:51 AM
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@prabhakar_deosthali: this issue has been addressed very well by NASA, Russian and other space agencies worldwide for some of the organic waste recycling (liquid in particular). In the last space shuttle mission, NASA tested a recycler to make pee drinkable! http://www.geekosystem.com/shuttle-urine-recycling/ MP Divakar

docdivakar
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re: To infinity and beyond: NASA's Orion spacecraft
docdivakar   5/11/2012 6:18:56 AM
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@resistion: It is mostly on the drawing boards for now... the Intl space station was one such facility which would function as the launch pad for deep space missions but so far it can barely sustain itself even with many countries in the partnership. There were concepts for launching from moon's surface into deep space but I remain skeptical of seeing that happen in my life time! I think robotic missions to Mars continue to make sense. These completely eliminate the challenges of sending astronauts to such spaces and bring the back home safe. When you take out the burden of addressing human safety in these missions, cost will not look as challenging. This, I believe, will happen in my life time! MP Divakar MP Divakar

Acepilot
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re: To infinity and beyond: NASA's Orion spacecraft
Acepilot   5/10/2012 3:22:06 PM
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A souped up Apollo capsule for deep space missions doesn't seem much like 45 years of progress! Is that the best we can do? Can you imagine sitting in that thing for 6 months? Talk about cabin feaver! During production of the movie "2001 A Space Odyssey", Stanley Kubrik consulted with NASA so that he could accurately show on the screen what spacecraft might look like in the year 2001. The Discovery space craft for deep space missions and the space station shown in the movie were some of the hardware that they were thinking of back then. But today, 45 years later, the International Space Station and this modified Apollo capsule are a far cry from the vision NASA once had. It is true that NASA has had severe budget cuts over the years, but as a Nation, it seems that we have made little real progress in space in the last 45 years. When you consider that China is working to put a man on the moon and we can't even put a man in space right now, it seems like we have taken a step backwards.

resistion
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re: To infinity and beyond: NASA's Orion spacecraft
resistion   5/9/2012 12:07:12 PM
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They'd never get far from earth if launched from earth, but can we have space launches?

prabhakar_deosthali
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re: To infinity and beyond: NASA's Orion spacecraft
prabhakar_deosthali   5/9/2012 10:09:08 AM
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For such a long duration flight , there has to be some kind of organic recycling system which help the astronauts on board to recycle their waste and create their own food. What kind of system has been designed on these modern spacecraft?

docdivakar
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re: To infinity and beyond: NASA's Orion spacecraft
docdivakar   5/7/2012 4:17:45 PM
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George, your opinion may indeed become reality unless US makes some strategic moves to get international participation. We should build on the cooperative model that was employed in case of the international space station. But increasingly, ROI becomes a challenging difficulty even for developed economies to address in a venture like that of Orion's. MP Divakar

docdivakar
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re: To infinity and beyond: NASA's Orion spacecraft
docdivakar   5/7/2012 4:12:19 PM
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@resistion: the shuttles (now retired) were never designed for deep space missions. All shuttle missions in the past operated below 400km altitude, well below the Van Allen belts so they were never in any radiation danger. MP Divakar

george.leopold
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re: To infinity and beyond: NASA's Orion spacecraft
george.leopold   5/7/2012 2:38:41 PM
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The chances of Orion ever flying are extremely slim. Given the current budget situation, Lockheed Martin would have to put up it's own money to get it launched, and that's not LM's business model.

resistion
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re: To infinity and beyond: NASA's Orion spacecraft
resistion   5/6/2012 3:07:20 PM
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Regarding safety, it seems very difficult to prepare for events in deep space, very far from earth, larger time lags. Maybe the shuttles can be brought out of retirement for emergency go-between use?

Bert22306
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re: To infinity and beyond: NASA's Orion spacecraft
Bert22306   5/5/2012 9:36:50 PM
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Very cool. And I agree, nice video. My only comment on these matters is, though, that it seems unlikely for any truly long term mission spacecraft to be viable if it isn't designed to spin on its axis, in order to simulate gravity. Six months without gravity, even with a strict exercise regimen, has been shown to be quite debilitating. So take a Mars mission, where the trip each way could well be longer than 6 months, and where even the gravity on Mars is a lot less than on Earth. In what shape will these astronauts be when they return? Anyway, in spite of this, it is great to see that these efforts haven't stopped. Wouldn't it be nice if NASA got some of the benefits from reductions in the defense budget? They never have.

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