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Sensing a touchy-feely haptic future

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WKetel
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re: Sensing a touchy-feely haptic future
WKetel   9/3/2012 12:44:02 AM
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A little bit of haptics is good, in that it allows one to know that the machine did in fact get your input, but beyond that it is a lot more stuff to fail and waste power, all to appease those without the ability to focus long enough to understand that something is happening. Just a lot more hardware to consume both resources and engineering talent. But it tends toward "product differentiation", the mother of many evils.

ReneCardenas
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re: Sensing a touchy-feely haptic future
ReneCardenas   8/29/2012 11:53:04 PM
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I wonder if there is potential for material fatigue, since after all is a mechanical force applied to panel surface. Can anyone shine some knowledge this way?

agk
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re: Sensing a touchy-feely haptic future
agk   8/28/2012 12:09:07 PM
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When this technology becomes advanced what can be made? My imagination is by combining with a 3D projection TV which projects in space, viewers can go into this space and feel themselves very much as if they are there.

Jon Green
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re: Sensing a touchy-feely haptic future
Jon Green   8/27/2012 10:21:36 PM
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If haptics technology sophisticated enough to give a sensation of texture is to become a regular feature of mobile devices, there will have to be a standardisation process. Drawing your finger across a virtual surface must feel the same everywhere: high-resolution haptics won't capture its market if the same command makes one device seem like smooth concrete, and another like coarse sandpaper. That's not going to be easy. Manufacturers will be using different technologies, and yet the programmers will need to rely on a reliable frequency range, and the ability to control depth of oscillation, and ideally also the area being vibrated. Haptics has the potential to open whole new markets and app types. It's now up to manufacturers to collaborate to make sure it can function reliably and consistently, so that developers can risk new, large, ground-breaking projects.

_hm
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re: Sensing a touchy-feely haptic future
_hm   8/26/2012 1:43:50 PM
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Purpose of digital technology was to simplify product design. Will introduction of haptics technology makes trends in reverse direction? For small product, it may be better to use conventional buttons or switches.

Bob.Jones1952
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re: Sensing a touchy-feely haptic future
Bob.Jones1952   8/25/2012 7:55:50 PM
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An alternative haptics technology uses electromagnetic rather than piezo exciters. Bending-wave haptic feedback devices accurately simulate the feeling of a mechanical button press, over multiple levels if desired, and can deliver the response to anywhere on a panel or touch screen or be programmed to give a specific response at a specific set of co-ordinates. For example, it's possible to simulate a dual level button of the type used on cameras - pressing part way to focus then a little further to take a shot. A further advantage of this technology is that the same exciters can simultaneously deliver an audio response from a flat panel to replace the eliminate for separate loud speakers in consumer electronic products. A touch screen can become a speaker, for example. Bending wave haptics is touch technology agnostic - it can be used with capacitive, resistive or piezoelectric touch screens.

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