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What were they thinking: Overly complex design

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kfield
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BIrthday cake contraptions
kfield   9/25/2013 12:29:39 PM
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I love this silly device. It reminds me of the time that we had a birthday celebration for my dad at the family gathering place. The cake we ordered was a circus theme and had a paper circus tent mounted on straws above the cake. The wait staff had lit the candles on the cake which was sitting on a sideboard near our table. Much to our horror, we noticed the entire circus tent go up in flames. !!

Frank Eory
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CEO
re: What were they thinking: Overly complex design
Frank Eory   7/3/2013 4:30:27 PM
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"And Claim 1 is also unduely restrictive." I was thinking the same thing! Despite the typical obfuscated dialect known as "Patent English," this claim is incredibly narrow. Even if this silly invention might have had some commercial value, this patent offers very little protection.

krwada
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re: What were they thinking: Overly complex design
krwada   6/6/2013 6:08:42 PM
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To tell you the truth ... I would have used a pressurized canister of ethyl ether as the 'blower'. In this case, one would get a very impressive, albeit dangerous flame discharge effect!

BrianBailey
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re: What were they thinking: Overly complex design
BrianBailey   6/4/2013 9:10:46 PM
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Yes, I thought that was a strange restriction but did not dig into whether there was a similar patent with a dog, or cat or...

dforce441
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re: What were they thinking: Overly complex design
dforce441   6/4/2013 5:04:31 PM
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And Claim 1 is also unduely restrictive; you could dodge the patent by making the device look like Wile E. Coyote or the Big Bad Wolf instead of with human features.

BrianBailey
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re: What were they thinking: Overly complex design
BrianBailey   6/4/2013 4:49:23 PM
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I think I agree with you on that, and besides it gives them the opportunity to charge more when they have to defend it because nobody else understands it.

Battar
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re: What were they thinking: Overly complex design
Battar   6/4/2013 6:09:12 AM
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"Claim 1 of this patent is further obfuscated by the patent lawyers into an almost unintelligible bunch of babble" That sentence is true of about 90% of all the patent applications I've read, and ususally it's a lot worse than this example. I've seen "ground engaging rotary propelling device" written instead of "wheel". I suspect that if a patent lawyer were asked to write a sentence in plain English, would would discover that this is a task he is incapable of achieving.

George Gonzalez
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re: What were they thinking: Overly complex design
George Gonzalez   6/4/2013 1:41:15 AM
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Sometimes it's hard to stop, our friends at the old HP sometimes had trouble putting on the brakes. I recall one horrendously expensive 3D graphics terminal from them, where they even designed a special screwdriver, that snapped into a special holder clip, just for tweaking the convergence adjustments.

Victim
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re: What were they thinking: Overly complex design
Victim   6/3/2013 7:50:01 PM
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An improvement would be to use compressed CO2 or even better an inert gas such as N2 to improve the extinguishing capabilities. Added party fun to use He for the effect upon the party attendees' vocal chords.

bcarso
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re: What were they thinking: Overly complex design
bcarso   6/3/2013 5:28:46 PM
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For a wonderful example of overdesign to no good end, see the John Addis contribution about oscilloscope vertical amplifiers in the Jim Williams compendium Analog Circuit Design, Art, Science, and Personalities (ISBN 0750691662). He describes a design review at Tektronix where some younger engineers presented a circuit of astonishing complexity, at that point only simulated. The IC was going to require 1200 transistors. One section of the circuit is reproduced. After a bit of consideration, some of the seasoned staff reduced that section to three transistors and a current source (pp. 120-122). And there was virtually no degradation in performance --- except for a 33% loss in current gain, in fact noise would be reduced, and linearity and bandwidth increased! John told me that he wasn't sure if the suggestions were actually followed.

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