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Engineering’s Three Rules: Document, Document, Document

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LiketoBike
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CEO
All of it...
LiketoBike   12/11/2014 1:04:20 PM
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@Julie, nice article.  I think I do all of it...


I keep an engineering notebook.  In it are meeting notes, phone call notes, and some engineering drawings and scribbles.

I keep one or more three-ring binders for a given project.  Number and size depend on size and duration of said project.  Often-referred-to data sheets, drawings, plots from test equipment, lengthy derivations, photocpies of a critical page from a book, printouts of key journal papers...

I also keep a project folder on the PC with many directories.  I try to divide a project up into logical sub-folders.  There will be folders for data sheets, relevant papers (with sub-folders for topical organization), documents (reports, proposals, presentations, etc), overhead stuff (like pdfs of orders and receipts), cad files, and folders for individual cad tools (one for spice, one for microwave circuit simulator, one for 3D field simulator, one for firmware, etc, etc).  One for photos - I take a lot of pictures of things with my phone to go into reports and presentations.  Others for special purposes that make their need known when they show up.

The notebooks stay on my shelf, except for the current one, which goes with me everywhere.  The binders generally stay in the office, except for the small one with currently-used stuff, which typically travels with me to meetings and home at night.  The PC gets backed up onto a server AND a desktop hard drive. 

Finally, my laptop is heavy since I don't have a desktop.  I don't always like dragging it home.  So I have files I may be currently working on (a proposal or a drawing or a simulation) also on a thumb drive, and schlep that back and forth so that I can get some work done off site without dragging the whole PC around.

Finding things again is key.  On the PC I can search.  In binders, I use dividers and label them for organization.  Key things are at the front of the binder, and may get individual sticky notes/tabs.  I have been known to use those also in my lab engineering notebook, and I summarize critical and frequently used information on the back page.

This whole mess has been evolving ever since I started designing anything, even before I went to college, and it just continues to change as the tools of our profession change.

Max The Magnificent
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Re: Managing email?
Max The Magnificent   9/2/2014 11:43:00 AM
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@David: This was in 2011 so maybe we should ask him to update his experiences...Max??

It's strange that something as ubiquitous as emaisl shoudl cause so many problems. For my personal emails I'm still using the same scheme you mentioned. I have a Google Apps account that gathers all of my email messages from the various accounts that seem to poliferate over the years. I use Outlook and Google Sync on all my personal machines, which means that all of the machines always re-sync when I power them up (and keep resyncing whilst powered up) and any actions like email messages that I send, receive, delete, whatever on one machine are replicated on all of the others.

I also have my UBM/EETimes notepad with my max.maxfield@ubm.com email account -- that has to be handled seperatly (sad face)

David Ashton
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Re: Managing email?
David Ashton   9/1/2014 12:37:11 AM
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@Karen... "Do you have any recommendations for how to keep your emails filed..?"

I don't, but I recall Max did a blog about it some time ago, and after a bit of searching I found it:

http://www.eetimes.com/author.asp?section_id=36&doc_id=1285089

Fortunately I am not as famous as you or Max so I don't need to think about this sort ot thing, but Max seems to have found a good solution.  This was in 2011 so maybe we should ask him to update his experiences...Max??

Sheepdoll
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Re: Managing email?
Sheepdoll   8/31/2014 11:55:44 PM
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I like using thunderbird.  This allows for multiple accounts and lots of sub folders.  For mailing lists, I have search patterns which sort the list into it's own digest folder.

Thunderbird sets up a local fork, which is an accountless email client. Useful when working with IMAP hosts.  It is also possible to set up additional headless POP accounts.  Works good for archival mail.

Sent and received messages can be copied to these headless account folders, where little icon allows the correspondence to be see in a threaded view.

I keep a folder named sync, for temporary messages or when I am traveling and need to download emails.

 

 

kfield
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Managing email?
kfield   8/31/2014 9:32:03 PM
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Do you have any recommendations for how to keep your emails filed? I feel overwhelmed and I don't manage it as well as I know I could/should.

betajet
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CEO
Re: Crap, more crap, and even more crap
betajet   5/21/2014 9:30:36 AM
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From Tennessee Williams' Camino Real:
Gypsy: This filing system is screwed up six ways from next Sunday... File this crap under crap!

Who would have guessed that TW would know so much about engineering records?

Anand.Yaligar
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Rookie
Re: Very nice
Anand.Yaligar   5/21/2014 6:54:26 AM
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@wave.forest: Not only that, if an engineer is methodical, nobody is going to stop him from reaching high in the company.

Anand.Yaligar
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Rookie
Re: Engineering Documentation
Anand.Yaligar   5/21/2014 6:53:13 AM
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@Spike_johan: Interestingly, this is what most trainee engineers suffer from in their first couple of years. "If you didn't write it down, you'll forget it" and "If you didn't write it down, you didn't do it". It is through hardship do they understand the importance of physical documentation. Going tech-savvy is good, but in order to build a technology, paper documentation is required.

Anand.Yaligar
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Rookie
Re : Engineering’s Three Rules: Document, Document, Document
Anand.Yaligar   5/21/2014 6:51:51 AM
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I like to document my work with the help of a simple technique: locality of reference. This means that I keep at hand those things that have equal importance to a project, even if I don't use them. Not only that, I label each section using the alphabets A,B,C etc, and write a summary of contents on top of every label. If I need a document on Software Post Processing that has been labelled in "T" and if the topics Software String Management in "Z" and Software Code Debugging Models in "R" are equally important to the project (even if they are not needed), I group the labels T,Z and R together. 

Sheepdoll
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Blogger
Re: Creation and retrieval of documentation
Sheepdoll   5/19/2014 2:07:56 PM
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@DrQuine - The challenge of documentation is that it is usually intended for retrieval in the future.


What I have found using the smaller one inch binders is that this size works for keeping the quick reference stuff.  The few pages of the data sheet one needs to access quickly like the pinouts and footprints.  I also keep the schematic,  and BOM in these thin binders.  I like to think of these as aking to the "pocket program guide." for easy quick reference.

Size does matter here as I like to reference some of these as a bedside reader.  The photograph was taken literately on my bed.  This size is also useful in the bathroom. Granted one can take the laptop, or phone into the loo (head or necessary)  Given that most of these now have Orwellian cameras on them, I am not sure I want to do that.  Or for this natural engineering and salty sailor talk topic to continue.

@Karen - My folders are quarantine, sandbox and guff.  Then there is the evenMoreGuff folder.   Disks and now thumb drives that I sneaker net with are called Noah, and ark.  These then go into quarantine.

 

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