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Why hasn't that steering wheel gone away?

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zeeglen
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re: Why hasn't that steering wheel gone away?
zeeglen   3/16/2011 2:28:05 PM
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Good solution for wheelchairs that do not normally travel at 70 MPH.

Bear1959
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re: Why hasn't that steering wheel gone away?
Bear1959   3/16/2011 3:39:39 PM
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Make everything DBW as desired. However, give me an independent backup system (DBW also if desired) for steering and brakes with their own independant power supplies. It is extremely unlikely two independant safety critical systems will fail.

Ocelot0
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re: Why hasn't that steering wheel gone away?
Ocelot0   3/16/2011 5:21:36 PM
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That's throttle, not steering...

Ocelot0
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re: Why hasn't that steering wheel gone away?
Ocelot0   3/16/2011 5:26:33 PM
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I was quite reminded of this last night, where I was driving in a heavy rainstorm in a badly rutted road. Every once in a while one wheel would hydroplane, pulling the wheel towards the side that wasn't. It was easy to tell via wheel feedback. They would have to greatly improve haptic feedback to get a joystick to do that.

zeeglen
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re: Why hasn't that steering wheel gone away?
zeeglen   3/16/2011 6:40:02 PM
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According to the local Honda service manager, both the Fit and Accord have rack-and-pinion with electric assist option. He had to ask a mechanical technician. Still waiting for a return call from the local Ford service manager. He also has to find a mechanical technician for the answer. I do expect the same, rack and pinion with electric assist. Does anyone remember when a service manager got to that position by rising up through the ranks instead of learning how to answer a telephone?

Treth
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re: Why hasn't that steering wheel gone away?
Treth   3/17/2011 6:54:42 PM
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Why would anybody advocate an all-electronic control of the steering on a car? There must *always* be a mechanical fail safe for steering (and brakes). Case closed. Is the ostensible reason to save money? You still need to steer the wheels. That involves a mechanical linkage, a gearbox, tie rods, everything that has been there on every car ever made. The only item you would be saving money on is the steering wheel itself. And replacing that with, what, an electronic gizmo that has to operate over the automotive temperature range? I don't see the savings. Even if there were a cost savings, is that sufficient reason to put the occupants' safety at risk?

David Ashton
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re: Why hasn't that steering wheel gone away?
David Ashton   3/18/2011 10:16:47 AM
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And how about this? Hacking a car through bluetooth... not easy apparently, but possible.... scary.... http://www.elektor.com/news/cars-hacked-into-by-bluetooth.1747885.lynkx?utm_source=UK&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=news

daveb
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re: Why hasn't that steering wheel gone away?
daveb   3/18/2011 3:23:08 PM
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In airplanes, if you drift a few degrees left, you likely aren't going to smash into anything or fall into a ditch. Much different in a car. That said, I could imagine an electronic "steering trim" control for long highway stretches, maybe tied to a vision system to follow lane markings...

Magic79
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re: Why hasn't that steering wheel gone away?
Magic79   3/18/2011 7:18:58 PM
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Real simple: If it works, DON'T FIX IT!

Etmax
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re: Why hasn't that steering wheel gone away?
Etmax   3/22/2011 6:18:46 AM
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This is exactly the point, planes are flown with a 1000m safety distance in X & Y, and something like 300m in Z. Our roads have as little as 50cm between vehicles. The additional risks associated with joysticks in planes are mitigated because of the 3D nature of flying. I have read news reports of drive by wire throttle control preventing a driver from stopping his vehicle for about 40km until he crashed it to end the nightmare.

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