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Disk drives fail in a particularly annoying way

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DrQuine
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re: Disk drives fail in a particularly annoying way
DrQuine   7/31/2010 11:34:50 PM
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Great stories. "Random failures" can be especially difficult to find - until you know the answer. I recall working on a postal mail sorting machine prototype a number of years ago that would randomly stop running and flames (literally) would shoot out of one of the integrated circuit chips. We finally discovered that especially thick mail pieces would bulge the sides of the mail track, that the metal would touch a contact on the circuit board, and the short circuited integrated chip would get so hot that the plastic would ignite. I'd never imagined that a chip could serve as a flame thrower before.

MHK_#1
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re: Disk drives fail in a particularly annoying way
MHK_#1   7/31/2010 3:21:24 AM
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This kind of debug would very annoying, until the root cause is found. Such an inconsistent failures, caused not from its function, but from the surrounding effect were drove me crazy a few times. In my case it was not temperature, it was a vibration from a fan. Oh. Thanks good. I got that eventually. Stay Cool!

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