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The electronic ghost in the optical network

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zeeglen
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re: The electronic ghost in the optical network
zeeglen   10/14/2010 4:26:28 PM
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Also the "in the shower" solutions. Only problem with those is having to get out and dry off to write it down.

mac_droz
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re: The electronic ghost in the optical network
mac_droz   10/14/2010 3:42:29 PM
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What about a "toilet seat" discoveries? (When you find a solution sitting on the toilet). I get plenty - that is why I think all the companies should have a good quality ones :)

wswbln
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re: The electronic ghost in the optical network
wswbln   9/27/2010 10:12:07 PM
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Well, uh..., isn't this common practice? ;-)

kfield
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re: The electronic ghost in the optical network
kfield   9/27/2010 1:26:54 PM
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Just curious how many engineers wake up in the middle of the night with a solution to a problem?

zeeglen
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re: The electronic ghost in the optical network
zeeglen   9/24/2010 9:44:01 PM
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Good sleuthing! "All 4 PWM oscillators on the same frequency and were synchronized": It's called "injection lock" where two or more oscillators with a sneak coupling path (usually through the common power rail or stray electromagnetic crosstalk) will lock to the one with the highest natural frequency. When they are all close in frequency, the one that crosses the digital threshold first and spews 'noise' into the surroundings causes the others which are almost at the digital threshold to cross prematurely, thereby syncing them.

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