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Computer mouse problems of the furry sort

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Salio
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re: Computer mouse problems of the furry sort
Salio   1/1/2011 1:43:59 AM
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I remember a coworker told me that he got a call from a customer that the recently installed XFMR and motor control center is not working. He went to the site and opened up the main compartment of the motor control center and he discovered that there is a dead mouse and it shorted out the main power cables to the motor control center.

David Ashton
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re: Computer mouse problems of the furry sort
David Ashton   11/26/2010 11:28:55 PM
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You SHOULD be concerned if you don't want your laptop to die suddenly. They may be very small ants but they can make big nests. They leave a stuff called formic acid which can eat away at your PC board and make a mess... Open up some of the parts of the laptop (like battery, hard drive, memory, CD, etc) to gain access to the inside, then leave some small bits of Mothballs (naphthalene) inside, making sure they won't get in the way of connectors or suchlike. The ants don't like the smell and will keep out. You'll have to repeat every few months, as the naphthalene sublines (evaporates) slowly.

Silicon_Smith
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re: Computer mouse problems of the furry sort
Silicon_Smith   11/26/2010 6:03:28 PM
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I see very small ants coming out of my laptop at times. I dont know whats up with that. I should probably be concerned, but its funny to watch them climb out of fan vents and USB ports!

mikellekim
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re: Computer mouse problems of the furry sort
mikellekim   11/23/2010 9:45:30 PM
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Living on Hawai'i in the early 90s, we had a tape-based answering machine on top of our fridge. But the tape doesn't play very well when ants stash their squishy larvae in between the loose layers of tape on the spool (not to mention inside the rest of the machine). "Hello, we'rre noooot hooooommmmmmmm ......" Cleaning out the tape and machine was getting old by the third occurrence, at which point I caught on that the warmth on top of the fridge made this a poor spot. A cooler location resulted in no further infestations.

rpcy
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re: Computer mouse problems of the furry sort
rpcy   11/22/2010 11:07:19 PM
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Probably oughta tell the fighter pilots that they're pretty safe from chickens, but cats are strictly see-and-avoid!

Frank Whiteside
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re: Computer mouse problems of the furry sort
Frank Whiteside   11/22/2010 5:16:18 PM
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In graduate school I had a job maintaining lab equipment at a medical research facility. Some of the researchers used rats, and once a rat got loose and hid in a large complex of drawers and cabinets. It took them months to catch it, and I had to make several repairs in that lab on its account.

zeeglen
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re: Computer mouse problems of the furry sort
zeeglen   11/22/2010 5:01:10 PM
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Started reading this and was reminded of that old joke in all it's various forms about the windshield cannon test that failed because someone used a frozen chicken. Also reminded of northern climates where at 40 below car block heaters are plugged into AC outlets overnight to ensure engines start in the morning. Stray cats like to sleep on those warm engines and can get a lethal awaking in the morning. Doesn't do the engine belts any good either.

mopoco
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re: Computer mouse problems of the furry sort
mopoco   11/22/2010 4:00:21 PM
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I used to work for a company that made, among other things, bird-resistant canopies (windshields) for fighter aircraft. One of the tests for these canopies was the impact test, in which a pneumatic cannon fired a mil-spec chicken (dead), at the canopy while filming with a high speed camera. It was always a bit of an event when the test was going to be done. The latest design had just been completed and the first demo test was to be done with the customer in to witness it. The cannon was loaded and readied for firing, but because it was lunchtime, they did not want to rush the test, so they decided to turn on the compressor to charge the air reservoir and break for lunch. After lunch, they returned, started the camera and pushed the button. The canopy failed miserably, shattering unexplainably. The engineers running the test noticed that there was an inordinate amount of chicken entrails splattered all over the place, so they processed the film and watched it. What they saw explained the failure and the excess chicken guts. While they were having lunch, a stray cat had crawled into the 15 foot barrel of the cannon, and its lunch and its life was rudely interrupted by the blast of air that accelerated it and the chicken to 300 mph before coming to an abrupt halt just 20 feet away.

Earl54
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re: Computer mouse problems of the furry sort
Earl54   11/22/2010 2:50:55 PM
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Along the pet hampster line, a few years ago our internet connection went down. Rebooting didn't help, so next step was the DSL modem, which had no lights. One of the kids must have bumped it and unplugged it. Nope, the wall wart was in the wall where it belonged. OK, bad modem or bad wall wart? Troubleshooting didn't take long, since when I picked them up they weren't attached. My daughter's pet rabbit had chewed through the power cord. A substantial amount of it, actually. I yelled, "Melanie, your rabbit just ate our internet connection!"

D.kirkbride
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re: Computer mouse problems of the furry sort
D.kirkbride   11/22/2010 9:29:27 AM
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when working as a tech on Geo' Exploration Team in a delta region in Africa, I was presented with a dot matrix printer with the statement, "it doesn't work properly". Sure enough on testing it had erratic carriage returns and wonky line spacings etc. I was fairly new at this sort of work but had already learnt that CMOS didnt like the very humid environment, fungus growing on the board or salt deposits (from getting dumping in the mud etc) so I carefully inspected and cleaned the board and connectors with a brush dipped in IPA. On refitting, it still didnt work properly. I announced to Joe, the wiley old chief tech, that it looked like getting a new board, or a protracted replacement of each ic. ( we never threw anything away, it alway had to be repaired to board level). He sniffed and took the board from me, after a few mins of consideration he gave it back to me pointing to an IC and asked me "how many legs does that 14 pin DIL package IC have"?.Confused I counted the pins and announced all were present and correct, then he held the board edge on to the light so that you could see the IC standing proud of the board (they did in those days)."now how many"? Under the IC were 2 more neat rows of legs. "its infested!". Sure enough, with a quick blast of compressed air under one end of the device resulted in a tiny 'roach shooting out the other. This resulted in a joint effort of blasting each IC and stamping on the offending insect. In total, I think we got about 10 from that single board. After carful inspection of the rest of the printer it was reassembled and tested as OK and presented back to the owner, who of course thought I was some sort of miracle worker (that's why we do this job, isnt it?)...

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