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The day Fortran code shut down a mill--or did it?

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David Ashton
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re: The day Fortran code shut down a mill--or did it?
David Ashton   1/24/2011 7:52:39 AM
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Yep...and it is brilliant. Have you ever noticed though that no one will take it seriously, no matter how applicable it is??

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re: The day Fortran code shut down a mill--or did it?
another nickname   1/17/2011 6:17:42 PM
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It's called "The Peter principle" . Published in 1969.

David Ashton
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re: The day Fortran code shut down a mill--or did it?
David Ashton   1/10/2011 9:16:52 AM
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Something like "Those that can...do; those that can't...supervise!" Cetainly holds true where I work....

Etmax
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re: The day Fortran code shut down a mill--or did it?
Etmax   1/10/2011 12:28:17 AM
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I once designed an opto isolated input circuit that had controlled switching thresholds, and between my design and the PCB manufacture my supervisor made some "improvements" that rendered the circuit unuseable :-) There's a reason why some engineers get promoted to supervisors, and it's not the reason that makes the system work better :-(

David Ashton
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re: The day Fortran code shut down a mill--or did it?
David Ashton   1/9/2011 11:53:18 PM
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My water pipes do that when you turn off a tap quickly.... I actually wondered if your supervisor had done it on purpose...I guess you'll never know.... Nice story though. Brings back memories...I worked as a techie many years back at a university Eng faculty and one of the perks was free courses. I did a Fortran course and had lots of fun with it. The craze for biorhythms was on then and I wrote a program to print out biorhythm graphs. Worked well until I forgot to end a loop once and used precious minutes of computer time and churned out about 50 yards of paper. I managed to convince the ops that it was a legitimate exercise for my course and managed to finish it, but it was a near thing. Good way to learn to always check your loops are terminated..... I think coming from that era with punched cards and text only prints makes you appreciate how far computing has come in the last 30 years.

dBruceP
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re: The day Fortran code shut down a mill--or did it?
dBruceP   1/9/2011 7:58:00 PM
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The bang was caused by hydraulic hammer as valves closed instantly while ther was heavy flow in the lines. Hammer can rupture lines and tear them from their moorings. Fortunately, that did not happen! Heart in your mouth? You got that right! I was totally devastated -- especially since I was going against the supervisors wishes. I do not think he intentionally sabotaged me though. But could not have dreamed up a more fitting retribution if he had tried. :-)

kfield
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re: The day Fortran code shut down a mill--or did it?
kfield   1/9/2011 7:21:35 PM
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David: I *think* it's supposed to be some sort of scenic view from the American Southwest--though maybe better as a Rorschach test!

David Ashton
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re: The day Fortran code shut down a mill--or did it?
David Ashton   1/8/2011 8:57:00 AM
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Got any jobs as copy-editors then Karen?? I actually thought there might be something missing. Makes a lot more sense now! The long arm of concidence again. I've had a couple of similar situations and boy do they put your heart in your mouth.... BTW Karen what is the background in your photo above? I can't make up my mind whether it is a church or Monument Valley....probably neither??

WKetel
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re: The day Fortran code shut down a mill--or did it?
WKetel   1/8/2011 1:20:04 AM
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Cutting power wires often will produce a bang. A classic example is operating the remote trip on a circuit breaker that is feeding a heavily loaded motor. That makes a loud bang. Aside from that, the cutting also may have tripped the E-STOP system, which is usually intended to cause a fast stop, in order to save somebodies life. But the misunderstanding about what was the cause of the effect is a common problem.

kfield
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re: The day Fortran code shut down a mill--or did it?
kfield   1/7/2011 2:27:35 PM
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David:I am so glad we have people on the other side of the planet reading EE Life before the rest of us get up! You caught an error in copy-editing -- the missing paragraph is now posted at the end of the article, which reveals the mysterious cause of the power failure!

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