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PCBs help take the measure of Mars

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Stargzer
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re: PCBs help take the measure of Mars
Stargzer   3/18/2013 1:43:18 PM
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The first thing I noticed in the graph was that the Ground Temperature has a larger swing than the Air Temperature, the opposite of what we experience here on Earth. I wonder if it's because the thin atmosphere on Mars has less mass than Earth's atmosphere, and therefore holds less heat.

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