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Frankenstein's Fix: The Dead Drill

Don Tavidash
10/25/2013 06:43 PM EDT

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Don Tavidash
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Re: Potential Thanks!
Don Tavidash   10/31/2013 8:56:28 PM
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Quickbadger - glad to be of help.   Apart from dry joints, check that the connection to the side of the battery is good - the silver bit you can see on the side of the upright black plastic thing on the small board in the 2nd photo.  It can move slightly and might not be contacting the battery, though I only had problems when "test-running" it with the charger out of the case.  I think the movement when you inster and remove the battery caused the wire to flex and cause the dry joint in the first place.

Always good to have a second drill - you can use one for drilling and one for screwing and not spend your life changing bits.  Good luck with it!

 

Don Tavidash
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Re: Your habit
Don Tavidash   10/31/2013 8:48:02 PM
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The Drill probably ranks as one of my best finds.   Some time ago I found some obsolete "Grid-sense" units - they attach to power poles and sense the electric and magnetic fields from the wires, and if they go off they flash to enable faultfinding crews to locate the fault.   They each had a small solar panel, a xenon tube, lots of red LEDs, and all sorts of other bits to scavenge off them, and there were 5 of them.  Rich pickings!

I think your mother was right.  I don't pick up combs either.

Quickbadger
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Potential Thanks!
Quickbadger   10/31/2013 2:56:11 PM
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I have that same drill at home that died 10 years ago.  The battery charging issues sounds very familiar.  I have always meant to fix it, but have not touched it since I bought an 18v set.

Now I'm curious enough that I'm going to check this out.

Duane Benson
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Component level repair
Duane Benson   10/28/2013 11:58:33 AM
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I've had a few experiences lately where I've been able to repair things that generally aren't considered repairable. One was an LCD monitor. I actually found a guy selling a small parts kit for, what is apparently a common problem with that type. I fixed a dead $120.00 monitor for $12.00. I've also repaired a bike computer and a few other items that I would have otherwise thrown away.

Years ago, just about everything was repairable, but that changed in the 1980's. I'm thinking that the tool sets, parts and information availability and overall knowledge has caught up with new manufacturing techniques such that people who are inclined, like you, can start treating a lot of devices as repariable instead of throw-away.

kfield
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Your habit
kfield   10/27/2013 10:26:20 AM
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Hi Don - nice story about resurrecting a dead drill. I am curious, though, about your habit of rooting around in dumpsters. What's the coolest thing you ever found? I personally like to pick up interesting things I see when taking walks, but always remember my mother once saying "Don't pick up that comb, you don't know what disease that person had!"

zeeglen
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Keep those drills out of landfills
zeeglen   10/25/2013 11:18:38 PM
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I've found it is often the bamn dattery that fails.  Good tale, (and good pen-name) Mr Don Tavidash :^}

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