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10 useful science and engineering search engines

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EREBUS0
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re: 10 useful science and engineering search engines
EREBUS0   6/19/2013 7:57:51 PM
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It has been a while since I did any detailed web searching, so I greatly appreciate your list. Mostly, I use Bing and have found it very useful. Thanks

elPresidente
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re: 10 useful science and engineering search engines
elPresidente   6/20/2013 3:17:38 AM
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I came to this piece looking for an UNBIASED search engine for engineers. Came away disappointed. Google has become next to useless in the past two or three years. You know things are grim when you look for an IC part number and the datasheet FROM THE MANUFACTURER turns up on page 7 or 8. That makes datasheets.com SPAM, in my book.

Kristin Lewotsky
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re: 10 useful science and engineering search engines
Kristin Lewotsky   6/20/2013 10:37:23 AM
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Thanks for your feedback.Is your disenchantment with Google related to the search engine as a whole or the Google Scholar offering? I follow a couple of researchy areas like nanotechnology, biotech,and drug discovery. I personally find Google Scholar to be helpful when I'm trying to hunt up a journal article and don't want to scroll past a bunch of trade-book articles and press releases. I'd like a little tighter time discrimination, but otherwise I think it works pretty well. If you have another tool you think works better, I'd welcome the recommendation. Tx, K

SEAN.NICKEL
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re: 10 useful science and engineering search engines
SEAN.NICKEL   6/20/2013 12:36:30 PM
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I couldn't agree more. datasheets.com is the bane of the internet for electrical engineers. The fact that it would even be listed as a "useful search engine" by this blog post not only damages the article's credibility, it hurts eetime's legitimacy. I know datasheets.com advertises here and even sponsors some "content". However, that doesn't mean eetimes needs to advertise for a site that is actively trying to make the web WORSE for engineers.

JeffL_2
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CEO
re: 10 useful science and engineering search engines
JeffL_2   6/20/2013 3:37:09 PM
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I'm still surprised how many people either don't know about or appreciate the utility to the engineering and general technical community of the following site, maybe they don't understand that the premise of "calculators" gets extended at the high end to include full functional simulation of various physical phenomena, see if you don't agree: http://www.martindalecenter.com/Calculators.html

DCH0
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re: 10 useful science and engineering search engines
DCH0   6/20/2013 6:14:30 PM
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My first choice for datasheets is Digikey. Easy to search and it turns up parts that are actually available. www.digikey.com

JeffL_2
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CEO
re: 10 useful science and engineering search engines
JeffL_2   6/20/2013 7:26:21 PM
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It's the best out there, even at that it's not perfect. Try using it to pick switching regulator parts for simple boost or buck applications and you'll see what I mean. You ought to be able to specify a desired input and output voltage and let the DATABASE select the parts that meet the spec. Instead they have you manually multiselecting possibly hundreds of ranges that overlap the voltage you actually wanted in the first place, and if you fail to hold down the control key for even one keystroke you cancel everything you entered and have to start over, in that one situation they seem to have created the absolute HARDEST way to get what you're looking for! But considering how nicely set up everything ELSE is I guess it's just the exception that proves the rule.

Duane Benson
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re: 10 useful science and engineering search engines
Duane Benson   6/20/2013 10:38:24 PM
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Digikey is generally the first place I go when looking for datasheets. They probably cover 80 - 90 of my datasheet needs, as well as most of my component purchases. The one challenge I do seem to get from DigiKey comes with parts that don't have clear part numbers or parameters - headers and other connectors, for example. In the catalog days, it was very easy to just page through, looking at the pictures to get close. That's much more difficult with an online catalog.

patrick.mannion
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Staff
re: 10 useful science and engineering search engines
patrick.mannion   6/21/2013 1:44:02 AM
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Hey Sean, I think the 'bane of the Internet' may be a bit of a stretch:) Lots of pretty bad stuff out there. Anyway, Datasheets.com is actually a partnership between us and Silicon Expert and is set up a service for engineers/procurement professionals to provide an independent source of product info from many distributors and suppliers, and then allow a good deal of comparative analysis before buying. We really do think it's one of the better independent (ie: none distributor run) sources, but of course we may be biased or flat out wrong. So please, by all means offer some suggestions for better ones you've used or could recommend, and maybe why. That would be very helpful to the other members. Thanks!

seaEE
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CEO
re: 10 useful science and engineering search engines
seaEE   6/21/2013 2:04:52 AM
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Speaking of confessions, am I the only one out there still hoping that AltaVista will regain its glory days? As far as searching for parts on the internet, if I search for a TI regulator, the datasheet ought to shop up near the top of page one. Maybe the semiconductor companies can partner with the search engine companies to make it happen. I like Digikey and Mouser also for part searching. Newark can also be useful.

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