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Book Review: More Than a Paycheck

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codebreaker
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re: Book Review: More Than a Paycheck
codebreaker   11/28/2011 1:48:27 PM
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In a way I am happy to see I am not alone with this feeling. I made what I thought were the right moves moving up and going into management only to realize now that while the money is good, I am bored and not able due to age, current salary and family responsibilities to drop back into a technical job again. I am looking to start my own business, it appears to be the best option for me, but the highest risk.

codebreaker
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re: Book Review: More Than a Paycheck
codebreaker   11/28/2011 1:44:46 PM
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g

Brian Fuller2
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re: Book Review: More Than a Paycheck
Brian Fuller2   3/15/2011 6:50:12 PM
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David, I found in my own situation, that time away from your chosen profession may create the "absence makes the heart grow fonder" syndrome... and give you a fresh perspective to dive back into it. You could grin and bear it and use your home workshop activities to engage kids/college students/neighbors to the wonders (and fun) of engineering. Or you could start a company on the side... (then again, I'm with you that you have to be financial logical about your choices, especially w/ kids/mortgage, etc.

David Ashton
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re: Book Review: More Than a Paycheck
David Ashton   3/14/2011 2:02:39 AM
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"Screw it. It want to something different." That just about sums me up (though I would have put it slightly more gramatically, Brian).... So I think I better get this book. I'm in a nice rut, good conditions all round but from a hands on component level guy I'm now a board changer. And pretty damn bored with it. That's the way it goes I guess, but with a mortgage to pay off and retirement not that far away, what do you do? I guess there are a lot of guys in the same position. Do you change to an interesting job and look at a pay cut of up to 50 % (not to mention losing out on some nice perks) or do you grit you teeth and carry on as you are? One of the strategies I use to maintain my sanity (what's left of it which is not a lot...) is to get into some interesting stuff in my home workshop...but there I have space and money constraints as well. But it sure helps.

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