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What made you become an EE? Join the Conversation

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betajet
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betajet   2/18/2010 11:38:17 PM
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First, let's take care of the bad news. Why would anyone want to encourge a child to go into a field where all the jobs are being outsourced to the cheapest country? If a kid has any brains, he or she will see that engineers are making $20K a year in China and investment bankers are making $20M a year on Wall Street. If you're good in math, do you want to teach math at a community college ($25K a year if you're lucky) or come up with "creative investments" on Wall Street and make $250K a year? So step one is to stop DIScouraging people from becoming engineers. Now for the trip down core memory lane... I was a born engineer -- it's a calling, not something that seemed like a good idea at the time. Most powerful influence from childhood was probably living a year in France and taking the Metro (or the London Underground) at every possible opportunity. There's something exhilarating about blasting through those tunnels on high speed trains of various vintages on a well-engineered, well-run system. Ditto for European electric inter-city rail. Ditto for the big old motors and wheels that operate those elevators at the Eiffel Tower, a cathedral of great engineering. Favorite toys were electric trains (how I designed my first finite state machine), Lego (pre-VLSI design with color rectangles), and Erector set (I'm from the last generation when 99% of engineers had Erector sets when they were kids.) I'm also from the last generation when you could take things apart and see how they worked. Can't do that any more: take it apart and there's a tiny circuit board with surface mount components. My mother made the mistake of getting me an "educational" game called "WFF 'n' Proof", which is a dice game for doing symbolic logic. Pretty useless as a game, since there was nobody to play it with, but I taught myself symbolic logic and then armed with a copy of the "GE Transisor Handbook" I created logic circuits using resistor-transistor and diode-transistor logic and a voltmeter. Being able to buy TTL logic as ICs years later was decadent in comparison. They say an expert should understand at least two levels below the level at which he or she works. So many computers and software nowadays are black boxes, so it's impossible to really understand what's going on. Even with open source the underlying software is so complex that the source code might just as well be absent. So what can be done to motivate the youth of today? Well, the born engineers don't need much motivation. Send them to a few Maker's fairs and give them some cheap microcontroller eval boards and let them play. As for the engineering jobs, history teaches us that whatever country has the best technology has the greatest influence in the world. You can't ship all the tech jobs overseas and expect to defeat history.

Raja242
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Raja242   2/19/2010 3:12:08 AM
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It was the interest in mathematics that got me into engineering. Engineering involves understanding the principles of both science and math, and the more you practice working on a diverse set of problems, by the end of the program you will reach a stage where you have pretty much all the tools needed to solve any engineering problem. I experienced myself through my masters where my problem solving was at the peak.

B Kockoth
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B Kockoth   2/19/2010 4:45:48 PM
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I have to agree many points with betajet. My initial motivation was that as an engineer I could work any place in the world. As many of you know by now, this idea completely backfired and here in Western Europe we are scrambling for every technical job that's left. When I was a kid magnetic levitated trains were a big thing in electrical engineering, some 35 years later there is only one in Shanghai operating on schedule. Other than that I was left with 60's style Lego and Fischertechnik to invent the things which later I found out existed for ages. Nowadays I try to forsee the trends and position myself to be useful when new technology becomes exploited more prominently. That's basically the only thrill left, new technology.

Semiconductor Design Engineer
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Semiconductor Design Engineer   2/19/2010 5:08:05 PM
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I wanted to become rich and have life long job security! :-( LOL :-)

Zsolt Kerekes
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Zsolt Kerekes   2/19/2010 5:26:22 PM
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As a geeky teenager in the early 1970s I got interested in electronics - which started with making amplifiers and effects for my guitar. That led me to do a degree in electronics - and I was lucky to graduate in time to design 1st generation products using the early 8 bit microprocessors. It was easy in those days - because no one knew anything. And if you could remember hex codes that made the assembly language go faster. (Later we bought expensive Intel boxes which cost more than my house - after we sold some of the products.) I was lucky to start my own VC backed company and have fun in my electronics career. There are hard parts too - and the unexpected - when physics rudely clashes with your model (physics always wins) - and the customer's clock is ticking and showing 4am. Although it's nearly 20 years since I managed electronic design projects I couldn't do my job now (as an SSD market analyst and commentator) without that background. And I'm still having to learn more about electronics than I ever thought I'd need to know. (Because many products are flaky and assembled by people who know block diagrams but not electronics.) Without electronic engineers our society couldn't function. If you want more pay - team up with a good marketer and start your own company. That's a tradition that's held true since semiconductors replaced the vacuum tube. Good luck in your careers.

StuRat
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StuRat   2/19/2010 6:40:56 PM
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I started out on a farm and just was born with thirst for knowledge, understanding how things, worked, and how to build things - understanding the building blocks and how they could be put together to make new things. My parents indulged me with an encyclopedia which I used to read like a novel, Tinker Toys, Lego, Erector Set, Lincoln Logs. It was music radio, slot cars and electric guitars that got me into electronics, I wanted to have the fastest slot car at the local track, so I started rewinding the motors, buying stronger magnets, etc. When I was a senior in high school in 1972, I still was thinking of taking over the family farm, when Nixon embargoed the Soviet Union and the wheat market tanked. I decided I wanted to go into a field where the goverment couldn't break your back overnight - how naive. I still haven't found one. I came of age watching the space race coverage, from Sputnik, Mercury, Gemini, Apollo, and those pesky Soviets keeping stride with us. I didn't notice how geeky the guys behind the NASA monitors looked, it looked like cool work to me. Now the kids see instant celebrity from gangsta rappers, Lady Gaga, foul-mouthed bloggers, and, yeah, betajet, Bernie Madoff and the Wall Street financial wunderkind. Knowing how to solve DiffEQs isn't cool, although we occasionally get a hero to cheer in a film like Apollo 13 or TV show like MacGyver. It starts in the schools. Teachers need to nurture the students with gifts for math, science, music, who have inquisitive natures, and who are persistent. Sound like any kids you know - not many around these days. The education establishment is all about "No Child Left Behind", which shackles the high performers together with the opposite end of the Bell Curve. Too much of the school curriculum is politicized, environmentalist pablum devoid of scientific curiousity, like the "settled science" of global warming. It's "the rain forest in Brazil is being destroyed, how does that make you feel?" instead of "why aren't there any rain forests in Canada?" The education establishment is more interested in telling kids WHAT to think instead of teaching them HOW to think. Thankfully, there are still a few that survive that environment and move through the social stigma of being a geek and a curve-raiser, and persist. Too bad we don't reward them on the level commensurate with their contributions to society. There are still a few people who want to know how iPhones and HD satellite TV works - wonder if we can make it 3D? At least there are a few cable channels like Discovery, NatGeo, PBS, and shows like Mythbusters (love those guys) that celebrate inquisitive minds and dismantling dogma and media misinformation. We could use a few more celebrity engineers and scientists to serve as role models - Dean Kamen comes to mind.

anon9303122
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anon9303122   2/19/2010 7:45:20 PM
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Radio Shack, Heathkit, and broken TV's and Hi-Fi's fished out of the dump, repaired and returned to duty.

mcgrathdylan
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mcgrathdylan   2/19/2010 8:21:59 PM
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Thanks to everyone who has commented so far- really interesting stuff to read. (Please keep them coming). I am seeing a reoccurring theme here- it sounds like for many of you this wasn't a choice as much as it was something you were drawn to (as betajet says, "a calling, not something that seemed like a good idea at the time.") The question is, why does it seem that fewer and fewer people feel that pull? Several of you have pointed out that the media tends to lionize rappers, athletes, celebrities, etc. I am betting that is not new. Engineering has never been a glamour job, and it seems like that suits most engineers I've talked to just fine. I agree with betajet's point, which I've heard before, that electronics have become so highly integrated and complicated that for the most part there's nothing to tinker around with anymore. And I think that stunts the growth of the profession. Kids who are so inclined might crack a gadget open to if they could figure out how it worked. And 20 years ago that was completely possible, conceptually. But today, not so much. I would argue that the same proportion of kids today are born with a natural inclination toward engineering, but that there simply isn't as much to nurture that curiosity and interest. Stuff is too complex and kids can't put themselves in the place of designing and building it. What is to be done about that?

Frank Eory
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Frank Eory   2/19/2010 8:25:59 PM
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As a child of the '60 and '70s, my interest in technology began with following the space program...and of course Legos, an Erector set and around age 9, taking apart a spare telephone to see what was inside. An interest in radio & TV as a teen lead me toward electrical engineering, and exposure to a Commodore PET computer in the late '70s sealed the deal for me. What better way to leverage my love of math & science into a rewarding career? Today, most of my co-workers are middle-aged like me. My company doesn't hire many young engineers in the U.S. -- those jobs are mostly in developing nations. My children are all fond of math & science and are very good students, and one is pursuing a degree in biomedical engineering -- a field that hopefully still has a future in the U.S. If any of them were interested in EE -- or specifically in doing hardware design as I do -- I would sadly discourage them, since the reality is there are not many hardware design jobs available in the U.S. for fresh college grads.

anon7643463
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anon7643463   2/19/2010 9:29:13 PM
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The big three draws seem to be: 1. exciting and popular event (space race) 2. accessible and novel tech (early personal computing) 3. Encouragement from relatives and friends who are engineers. All three examples are diminished these days: manned space exploration has stagnated, computing is now complex and commonplace, and engineers are marginalized in pay and job security and so are less likely to encourage others to follow. I'm positive #1 and #2 will happen again in some form. #3 will then follow.

Streetrodder
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Streetrodder   2/19/2010 9:46:39 PM
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What got me into Electrical Engineering? Some bizarre twists and a 'why not' attitude... I grew up on a farm and wanted to make a living building custom cars. In going into the Coast Gaurd, I found the only job close was working on aircraft. My eyes wouldn't let me do that; the recruiter suggested electronics tech and I said 'why not'? I continued as a tech after the military until my military knee injury rendered that impossible. Over that time, I grew frustrated with the terrible design work I saw; the equipment was not designed to be worked on, which I though was incredibly stupid. When the VA offered me retraining I said I wanted to get an EE degree, surely I could do a better job the those already working. Of course I realized in school that engineers were only following what they were taught - no one taught design for lifecycle. Notice I didn't mention my family or school. High school was 'college for the rich' and my family told me 'we don't go to college' What could influence new people? It's got to be a non-financial calling. In this greed based culture we currently live in, I feel it's a hopeless task. However, I will be at our local Science Center this weekend promoting the field. (Oh yeah - as the nickname indicates, I did get to build a custom car. And look forward to building another.

akim
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akim   2/19/2010 10:44:33 PM
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I became engineer out of couriosity; I liked to find solutions and develop an understanding of complex problems by using programming languages and I simulated systems like mechanical networks or tried out optimization algorithms. Recently I asked my son, what he would like to become and he said in turn: "nothing that somebody can do for half the money abroad". Frightening how worldly-wise kids are nowerdays. Looks as if word has gone around.

steven251
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steven251   2/20/2010 12:44:38 AM
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I became a Radio engineer after learning that Amateur radio operators could talk as well as listen. Now as an IEEE Life member I have had the privilege of watching the electronics industry grow from discrete to integrated circuits, computers shrink from roomful to palm size and witness ever increasing product complexity. The biggest personal challenge was learning an international standard that withstood the test of time. I chose Ethernet (IEEE802) in the late 1970's and have ridden that wave for 30+ years. My son is in the legal profession where the knowledge base consists of Federal, State, local laws and ordinances.

Jerome12321
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Jerome12321   2/20/2010 1:27:34 AM
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I first went into engineering for the money, but eventually realized that I actually love electrical engineering (especially analog and RF) and can't imagine doing any else for a living. I was not a geek at all in high school, did not even know anyone that was a geek, and was much more interested in sports, making money, etc. I believe that had I learned about engineering as a profession at an earlier age that I would have latched onto it right away, which is why I believe that an introduction to engineering course should be taught in all high schools. I was very lucky in that engineering was the best paying 4-year degree at the time, and the lure of money led me to a career that has many rewards beyond financial gain. If the engineering field had not paid well when I was choosing a college major, I may have missed out on one of the most interesting careers that can be imagined! Jerome Analog/RF/Systems Engineer

TechonNow
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TechonNow   2/20/2010 3:11:37 AM
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My career in high-tech has been a wonderful adventure, a challenging voyage spanning technology, international business, and a network of extremely intelligent and driven colleagues. Electrical engineering, even more than most disciplines, has transformed our lives as well as the global economy! I would definitely recommend a career in technology to any woman, or man‚?¶ It is positive, enjoyable, and lucrative! My father, Carl, was an engineer....he taught me sines, cosines and tangents at the dining room table when all I REALLY wanted was to learn multiplication tables for my elementary school class! Result: love for math. And my mother, Nancy, could solve any math problem....as long as there was a $ sign in front of the number! OK, the business side too was inculcated early. I read "The Existential Pleasures of Engineering" by Samuel C. Florman and saw myself. Silicon Valley was the Mecca in 1981 and it drew me. But: I was one of 4 female students in my BSEE class...And still today I am too often the only woman in the technical meeting room! How many women engineers and technologists are there, especially in positions of influence? How do we fare, and what can be done to crash through the ‚??silicon ceiling?‚?Ě For women AND for men, a chance to learn from women in engineering who have "been there, done that," I encourage you to come to the DAC 2010 WWED/WWINDA Workshop! Details will be posted on the DAC website in April - hope to see you there! Holly Stump Jasper Design Automation

jrobill
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jrobill   2/20/2010 2:30:04 PM
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Became an EE for the love of inventing. When I was a youngster, I always invented stuff, and becoming an EE provided a better means to accomplishing more. Then working in various companies, the motivator was making a product or subsystem that was worthy of becoming a product. I had lots of fun in the those days. I think the most important thing of being an EE is the hope of doing something great.

bkeller137
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bkeller137   2/22/2010 3:32:17 PM
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I think my interest in engineering stems from a keen interest in solving puzzles. At 6 I had a mechanical mechanism implemented to turn on/off the light in my bedroom when the door was opened/closed. At 10 I created my first 25 by 25 correctly formed crossword puzzle for school. I graduated high school 1 year early and at that time, electrical engineering was shown as basically power engineering of power stations and transmission lines. I chose to pursue chemical engineering because it seemed a bit more difficult and that interested me. After 2.5 years in college, I discovered chem labs gave me a huge headache from the (organic) odors and switched to computer science having fallen in love with programming an HP 67 calculator. I turned down job offers with more pay to work in EDA where I could combine computer science and EE to solve many puzzles. I knew college ChemE buddies who were offered jobs to work for 2 years in Saudi Arabia with all expenses paid and $100K free and clear (but don't fraternize with the locals). For several years while at IBM I participated in projects that brought science and math to schools and that was fun. It is disingenuous for leaders to say we need to emphasize math and science more in our schools, when I and others see first hand how colleagues with math and science degrees are laid off and their jobs are sent overseas to help the company be competitive, even without any data to show that it is in fact helping. Because we didn't complain enough when it was happening to blue collar jobs, it seems poor for us to complain now when it affects us. It will be painful adjusting to the world economy as it naturally seeks to equalize pay for equal work around the globe for all countries. Still, I have to say that it has been good to solve puzzles and be paid fairly well for doing it for 31+ years.

djs2571
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djs2571   2/23/2010 2:46:39 PM
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From a young age, I was always interested in how things worked, my dad being an electrical engineer may have helped a bit too. I had an instinct to pull things apart to see what made them work, mechanical ability helped, so I could get things back together too. In high school I got more interested in audio amplifiers and had the urge to know how they worked, so I could make & repair them. That is when I made the decision to get into EE when i'd go to college. I'm now on the R&D side of electronics, some new products, some test equipment. I don't see many people with an interest for how the internals of things work. Without that yearning to know, i'm not sure how you can motivate people to get into a field.

Evgeni
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Evgeni   2/24/2010 4:22:55 PM
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My father was an EE. I had a small lab at home: oscilloscope, equipment to do PCBs, a wide selection of electronic parts. At the age of 12 I built my first AM radio. By 17 my career choice was clear.

tfc
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tfc   2/24/2010 4:26:53 PM
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What made me become an engineer? I would say a troubled childhood and being poor. In First grade, I tried to design an automobile piston that would clean up pollution (1969) that was very impractical. In Third grade, I was drawing reel-to-reel computers in my lunar walkers (1972). In Jr. High, I designed, hard shell space suits, tried to block diagram an AI (1975). In high school (early 80?s), I was drafting, nuclear subs, nuclear tanks, nuclear cities, recycling systems (ecological and rebreather), space stations, space capsules, space shuttle experiments (sent one to NASA), biological batteries (this worked), solid fueled rockets (from scratch, some worked), prosthetic limbs , and a lot of other garbage I can?t remember. Then I went to a few engineering schools and held several jobs and that quickly cured me of the engineering and creativity bug. If there had been earlier intervention (say First grade), I could have spent a lot more time playing and socializing with people, instead of now sitting in an office alone for years designing embedded hardware and software (think I?ll risk putting a plant in my cubical). I would talk about the pay, lack of benes, and no vacation since 2008, but I do not want to depress you or cast a disparaging light on engineering. Instead, I will talk of the good times.

AdamSmithLiberty
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AdamSmithLiberty   2/25/2010 8:14:30 AM
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I started off taking apart tv's, radios, and electronic devices when I was just in elementary school and always wanted to know why and how it worked. Later on I kept watching Japanese sci fi movies and animes. In Japanese films they had a tendency to show engineers as intelligent and creative which also help peak my curiousity. I read books about Nikola Tesla and other popular science books. It was amazing how Tesla developed the theory for AC, made the 1st radio (1943 supreme court overturned Marconi's patent), remote control boats, wireless energy which didn't quite work on a large scale. Tesla had so many ideas that we are just coming back to again today with new names. I got my associate degree in electronics, then got a bachelors in electrical engineering, and am working part time on my masters degree in electrical engineering while volunteering for the IEEE. I work as a communication systems engineer at an electric utility company and noticed that if you work in the union you made better pay than as a salaried engineer, so most engineers work as technician at my utility company. To get kids interested we should have more positive role models maybe in tv, movies. There are many shows about doctors, lawyers, fire fighters, cops. Highlight more prizes such as the X prizes and show the excitement in actually producing something useful. Show that it is challenging and rewarding. I know when I hear my boss say something is impossible or very difficult I am the first in line start investigating the problem. I had two older cousins in electrical engineering, one an enterprise system support engineer for ncr, and another a hardware engineer for national semiconductor. So it ran in my family a little bit. I agree with some of the others above that today everything is a blackbox and difficult to understand. There are a few hobbyist companies such as Parallax that have nice micro controller kits that are simple enough for anyone to understand and well documented manuals. By the way I am 35 years old and was one of the last classes in tech school to learn about discrete electronic components and parts of old 8085 computers, the programmable counters, timers, trouble shooting with logic probes. It is sad that the people graduating from my old tech don't really understand anything at a component level anymore. I will leave everyone with one of my favorite quotes "Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic." "The only way of discovering the limits of the possible is to venture a little way past them into the impossible." "When a distinguished but elderly scientist states that something is possible, he is almost certainly right. When he states that something is impossible, he is very probably wrong." All Arthur C Clarke. And one last quote "We are the music makers, and we are the dreamers of dreams." ‚??Willy Wonka I wish the next generation of children surpass us in knowledge and wisdom to apply it properly. I get worried when I see the kids graduating every year from high school, a very few are sharp, and many will need to look for jobs at Walmart. Regards, Steven P.S. A few great role models are Burt Rutan of the X prize for the first commericial space shuttle. Steve Wozniak for all his contributions to computer engineering and funding Burt's project. And finally Dean Kamen for all his great inventions and all his volunteer work with children.

mhz*
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mhz*   2/25/2010 7:23:13 PM
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i wasn't one of the kids that "took everything apart". sure i did a little of that but who didn't? my interest in electronics grew out of my interest in a band that used a technique called circuit bending (google it) to make some of their musical instruments. i took it up as a hobby. i guess i waited until my 20s to go through the "taking things apart" phase. i remember being intensely curious at what was going on inside those little black rectangles on the circuit board and now here i am 9 years later with a fresh ee degree just starting my career, for better or worse.

HWisnotSW
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HWisnotSW   2/27/2010 11:23:25 PM
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What can/should be done to motivate more young people to go into engineering? You can start by persuading the community of technical magazine editors to stop insulting current working engineers by inplying that they're economically illiterate. The ridiculous premise of this question is that current engineers -- typically either underemployed or overworked -- have any interest in motivating others to go into this profession. We don't. Technical magazine editors and engineering school deans have their own incentives (more readers to expose to their advertising and more tuition-paying students), but those do not necessarily dovetail with the incentives of the current working engineer, whose marketability, salary, and treatment by employers only rise in proportion to low supply & high demand. This is not to say that we wouldn't help/assist/guide any young engineers we were privledged to work with (I have, and I will), but we should be honest about whose interests are really being served in the pursuit of certain goals. Mentoring a 22-year-old once they're here is a much less difficult moral decision than encouraging them to choose this profession (from among competing alternatives) in the first place, given (a) the tenuous positions many American engineers historically face beyond age 40, and (b) the likely continued exodus of technical work to the east. To return to your original question, start by directing it toward the people who care about it the most: not Engineers, but the Engineering Managers & Business Leadership of tech companies. They're the ones who SHOULD HAVE a vested interest in this, and they're the ones with DO HAVE the capacity to make the profession more attractive. Just don't bother asking my company's (a giant California aerospace firm HQ-ed in Massachusetts) management: they have a rapidly aging workforce and no succession plan on the horizon. Evidently, their lump-sum retirement payout provides no incentive for long-range planning. What was it that first inspired you to answer the calling? The space program of the 60's and 70's. Good luck recapturing that kind of vision. http://www.haydenplanetarium.org/tyson/read/essays/nathist/spacetraveltroubles Is it something that could still resonate with today's youth? The premise of this question is that there's something special about "today's youth" such that they might NOT aspire to have (theoretically) useful, intellectually stimulating work. Please elaborate, as I admit I know little about them .... beyond the mythology that they're consumed by video games and text messaging.

no clever name
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no clever name   3/1/2010 2:34:22 PM
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engineering is a calling, and I was called. I have done OK, nothing earthshaking. But I have managed to stay employed. For those called now, don't listen. Go into medical, actuary, banking. Rod

jahnavi_kolli
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jahnavi_kolli   3/1/2010 5:37:56 PM
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It was pretty much my interest in Mathematics which got me into engineering. Kids may hear about the decline in Engineering industry/ lay offs from their parents and get uninterested in it. But when you see the decline, it is not just engineering, decline is in every other industry. It obviously doesn't make sense selecting other industries when you get paid more or better in engineering. For example. In India, Lecturers in IIT are paid 3 Lacs whereas a student graduated from IIT is paid 12 lacs. It is funny when people say there is no job satisfaction in engineering jobs. When you work hard the whole day to solve an issue and solve it, you do get job satisfaction and feel good of yourself. Job security is getting worse in every industry. Parents and teachers have to take responsibilty to explain kinds about the imporantace of engineering and how it changed the world and tell them to select their own field. I bet they will consider engineering.

Ken Konesky
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Ken Konesky   3/12/2010 3:03:48 AM
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I got interested in engineering when I was quite young. I loved working with electronics creating things. When I was in high school we had an awesome Electronics teacher. It was an ROP program and was the best for 100's of miles. It was great. We made things, we learned to fix things. Great fun! When I landed my first EE job, it was great, but lots of work and quite diverse. Again, I fixed things. My second EE job (still work for this company) things have changed A LOT. I used to work in manufacturing where my responibilities were to ensure quality manufacturable products. It was great. Then things started changing and we started getting out of manufacturing. I decided I wanted to stay an engineer so I moved to R&D (mostly D) in my company. Now we are getting out of the "D" with more and more outsourcing. I think engineering where we are creating things and solving problems is alot of fun, but we are doing less and less of it. It seems we are spending more and more time jockeying for the fewer and fewer jobs than we are on engineering work. Too bad, engineering can be very rewarding for those that are wired for it. What can we do to encourage it? Perhaps bring back the importance of engineering. As someone wrote earlier, in todays world the money mongers get the big salaries and are more valued in our economy than those who actually create and "do" something.

Salio
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Salio   8/15/2010 5:24:33 AM
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The people who contributed their time, money, and/or services during the National Engineering Week (NEW) are commendable. I think events like NEW are definitely a good thing to bridge the gap between people who are in the profession with people who are not. It is sort of a leap into the future for some. I think we should have events like NEW, which bring engineers from all sorts of areas together for a common cause to bring more people into the profession. Whether or not NEW will solve the enrollment decline in the engineering profession is an entire different issue. From my own experience as a kid growing up in a third world country and with not too many resources I can tell you that we need to start the effort of creating interest in our children in their childhood. I came to the USA in 1987 and went back to my country in 1991 and returned to the US in 1994. While I was in my country, my uncle thought me Math and English. I used to work on them 4 to 5 hours a day for about 3 years. I learned Math from basic addition/multiplication/subtraction to intermediate Algebra, Trigonometry, and Geometry. I was not allowed to use a calculator to basic computation and had to learn tables up to 12 and then later up to 15. I believe that the parents need to push their kids towards math and science during their early childhood. I believe that is the only way to fix the problem facing us today.

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EE Times editor Junko Yoshida grills two executives --Rick Walker, senior product marketing manager for IoT and home automation for CSR, and Jim Reich, CTO and co-founder at Palatehome.
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