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Comment: retrain and retain engineers in Europe

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eng1230
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re: Comment: retrain and retain engineers in Europe
eng1230   6/13/2009 1:31:01 AM
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Why does management think experienced or older engineers would be "bored"? I heard that comment made about me a few years ago and it was insulting. Experienced engineers have a pretty good idea of what works but that attitude can be perceived by management as uninterested. How can fundamental laws be broken? Over the past decade I have had to in a way train engineers especially at low-cost outsourced destinations and to keep ahead of this competition have to continuously learn new skills.

akim
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re: Comment: retrain and retain engineers in Europe
akim   6/10/2009 11:14:21 PM
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Maria Marceds comments must sound cynical in the ears of thousands of experienced engineers that have been layed off and are neither old (<40) nor bored. I have been layed off myself recently together with 20% of the workforce and my former employer did not even make losses. I received a very good reference and applied for many jobs as analog mixed signal designer, but in vain. I learned, that many job offers receive hundreds of applications, but are imaginary and not planned to be staffed currently. I can not understand, why some HR managers are proclaiming a threatening scarcity of skilled engineers under such circumstances. My apprehension is, that European electonics engineers might be valued again in around 20 or 30 years, when Chinese and Indian companies will be looking for cheap engineering resources elsewhere. Up to then it might be better to think twice before studying electronics to make a living.

Literate
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re: Comment: retrain and retain engineers in Europe
Literate   6/10/2009 9:25:12 PM
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Although I might have a wrong timing here with this point, but I would like to add the following: Those non-EU engineers I know, who came to Europe, once lost a job have even bigger troubles with finding another job, along with visas and work permits they will never have a chance to be taken to job by a company involved in aerospace, radar- and other key techniques, that is why I personally find articles like the "Analog expertise dwindling in Europe, panel says" far from the "real world" we live in. Please get me right, I don't complain but simply warn the newbies.

bill1230
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re: Comment: retrain and retain engineers in Europe
bill1230   6/10/2009 6:33:05 PM
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employers want cheap, plentiful engineering labor - ie young, well-trained, willing to work 60hrs weeks. engineers want security, good pay, interesting work, high social status.

RedKen
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re: Comment: retrain and retain engineers in Europe
RedKen   6/10/2009 12:30:40 PM
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The young will choose Science/Engineering/Technology as a profession when: 1. It is viewed as high status 2. It offers a salary that guarantees a good standard of living 3. It offers opportunities for career progression 4. It offers job security It would be difficult to argue that the profession offers all the above at present in Europe. The way to get young Europeans to come through into Engineering is quite simple - look after the older Engineers. Once the young see older Engineers living comfortably, enjoying status in stable, long-term employment, we may be able to tempt high calibre students to take-on Engineering or Science degrees. This may seem idealistic in current turbulent times, but comments such as those from Marced give the impression that older, experienced Engineers are under valued and simply left to rot once made redundant. I would imagine they will have gone down like a lead balloon in some quarters and might even be contrary to European ant-ageism laws. Is ageism flourishing in the European semiconductor industry? Just the other week, in the face of redundancies, Bozotti proudly declared that ST "is now a leaner, younger, more innovative, faster and yet powerful competitor in the world semiconductor arena." What did he mean exactly? Marced and perhaps Bozotti should bear in mind that Engineers have children too. I wonder how many older Engineers, employed or redundant, will recommend Engineering as a profession to children about to make career choices. Older Engineers going back to some of the jobs needing to be filled would be "bored."? Getting bored is probably the least of their worries! The semiconductor industry is no longer the ‚??young‚?Ě industry it once was. It should expect to have an ageing workforce and should respect and look after those that have served it well. Let‚??s face it, any Engineer that has done 20 or 30 years in what is probably the fastest moving, most technologically advanced industry there is, is very unlikely to be a complete Bozo! Also given current Pension shortfalls, many Engineers below the age of 50 can now expect to work to at least 70. What will they do?

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