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Smartphone adoption opinion

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selinz
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re: Smartphone adoption opinion
selinz   8/10/2010 12:17:59 AM
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Back to Rick's original question about what device I smoke, I'm one of two or three people on the planet still using Windows mobile... And I believe that my user experience is second to none. People around me at work have iphones, blackberrys, androids, etc. But none of them can sketch, input text via handwriting, tell me what song I'm listening to (or singing)in the coffeeshop, tell me the Amazon price by reading the barcode, give two outstanding web browsers, one of which runs flash, accept voice commands, photo-read-translate business cards directly into Outlook, download audiobooks for free from my library, read pdf's, watch live television, and has fully functioned GPS, mapping, and health related apps. Finally, it has more games than a person could ever want to play. I tend to play chess, backgammon, solitaire, and poker when in "undisposed" places. My phone is nearly 2 years old and there is no phone that I can switch to that wouldn't result in a loss of functionality. It had twice the pixels of an iphone until the iphone4 came out. Other phones "almost" have it.. It'll be interesting to see if I have a reason to change by November.

nicolas.mokhoff
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re: Smartphone adoption opinion
nicolas.mokhoff   8/6/2010 2:47:48 PM
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Mark: I agree on the the freedom aspects of having a remote wireless connection to the world you want to leave behind but can't because it would create a vacuum between what you should know and do, and what you would like to know and need to know and act on. It sounds from your description that you are very organized person. It IS a matter of choice and prioritizing your work schedule. No smartphone can teach you those 'smarts'.

Mark Wehrmeister
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re: Smartphone adoption opinion
Mark Wehrmeister   8/5/2010 3:38:15 AM
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I couldn't imagine not having a smartphone these days. Once you have an iPhone or Blackberry you can be more free than you ever were before if you use it appropriately. I use my iPhone many times a day to get information on what I want to do, where I want to go, and how to get there. I use it for keeping track of everything so information about my schedule, passwords, to-do lists, business expenses, etc. are at my fingertips wherever I am. I use it for email too, but usually only as a way to screen for important messages, most other messages can wait until I have access to a full size keyboard. Yes, it tethers me to everyone I know, but this tether also provides freedom to go where I want when I want.

yalanand
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re: Smartphone adoption opinion
yalanand   8/5/2010 2:39:40 AM
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Junko, As Himanshu said smart phone will cost you around 150Euros. To be frank 3G services were launched recently that too in major cities by telecom majors like BSNL and AIRTEL (per minute usage of 3G will cost you (1/50th of dollor). As more and more telecom palyers are entering the Telecom space prices are driven lower day by day. You might be knowing the case of Virgin mobile "They will pay you if you receive call on their network" :)

ylshih
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re: Smartphone adoption opinion
ylshih   8/5/2010 2:30:01 AM
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Mobile content on a smartphone has been a great boon for me. But, smartphones can be a blessing or a curse and it depends on the owner and the expectations they set. Between voice, email, texting, twitter, et al, there is no excuse for being disconnected; so you have to be willing to turn off your phone or ignore it if you want any breaks or privacy and the senders have to accept that. If you don't and they don't, you've just put a ten thousand mile leash on yourself!

chanj0
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re: Smartphone adoption opinion
chanj0   8/4/2010 10:58:35 PM
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New display technology and new keyboard are going to come out to be part of the next revolutionized smartphone. How are they going to be? We will need to wait for the technology to come and the market to tell. Nonetheless as the communication technology evolves, I realize. "Advanced communication connects people who are distant from each other and disconnects people who are next to each other." What an irony!

wilber_xbox
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re: Smartphone adoption opinion
wilber_xbox   8/4/2010 6:10:20 PM
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Junko, the problem in India is not the cost of the smartphone but the cost and connectivity to 3G networks. i read a nice article about the speed and cost of mobile internet here http://blogs.wsj.com/indiarealtime/2010/08/04/india-journal-why-iseethe-at-iphone/ I remember that my parents bought a nice mobile (not smartphone), which can accept two sim at once. They bought it for Rs 3000 (about 50 Euros). I can not find such a phone in Europe at such a price! I think you can get a smartphone (compatible to 2G/3G) within 150 Euros in India.

wilber_xbox
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re: Smartphone adoption opinion
wilber_xbox   8/4/2010 5:59:24 PM
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@KB3001 You are not alone to think this way. I have a samsung smartphone which i bought two year ago. I liked the power of being connected to others all the time but i started to loose my privacy. I am going back to the old mobile phones which i need just to call.

rick merritt
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re: Smartphone adoption opinion
rick merritt   8/4/2010 5:48:29 PM
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Dear KB3001: Laptops are the new desktops and desktops are the new mainframes. Eventually you will consider somnething that fits in your pocket your primary computer and communicator--but we need to solve this little problem of small mobile displays and "keyboards." Meanwhile, iPads are a fun diversion.

junko.yoshida
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re: Smartphone adoption opinion
junko.yoshida   8/4/2010 5:37:07 PM
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Thanks, Yalanand. Roughly, how much does a smart phone cost in India (in cojunction with the 3G network fee in US $) today? I am curious. Is the cost no longer an issue? Actually, in the case of Japan, the cost is a non-issue for Japanese consumers (they can afford it). The real problem is the service providers' unwillingness to embrace a truly open application world.

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