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Should Google be in 'white-space' radio?

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LarryM99
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CEO
re: Should Google be in 'white-space' radio?
LarryM99   6/20/2011 9:34:54 PM
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Actually, the FCC is defining the rules around the utilization of white space. It is very different than the typical ISR bands. There is still the possibility of a "Tragedy of the Commons" problem, though, if commercial utilization of white space threatens someone's business model. I could imagine, for example, Verizon or AT&T flooding this spectrum with a busy signal of sorts if it threatened their monopoly of the airwaves. Larry M.

Peter Clarke
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re: Should Google be in 'white-space' radio?
Peter Clarke   6/16/2011 11:37:02 AM
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Neul remains confident that as long as the digital TV broadcasts stay they wont be bumped out. However, i would be less confident that the spectrum will remain free to use. Death and taxes remain pre-eminent so if Neul does create a multi-billion dollar industry you can expect governments will come sniffing. Just like they are beginning to sniff again at the Internet.

Peter Clarke
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re: Should Google be in 'white-space' radio?
Peter Clarke   6/16/2011 11:34:39 AM
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It is true that where analog television is being cleared completely out the way that spectrum is being re-assigned. But Neul is attempting to use the same frequencies used by digital television broadcasts but avoids the particular frequency band used by those digital TV broadcasts in a particular geographic area. There is a requirement on anybody that uses these so-called "white space" channels not to interfere with the digital broadcasts and that is a non-trivial radio communications exercise, so I am told.

DrQuine
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CEO
re: Should Google be in 'white-space' radio?
DrQuine   6/16/2011 11:25:40 AM
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What are the communications protocols within the unused 400 MHz to 800 MHz spectrum? If it is an unlicensed free-for-all, it would see that there would be a risk of incompatible interfering signals. Also, wasn't one purpose of moving from analog to digital TV (and shutting down analog TV) to open up new bandwidth for necessary services? It seems surprising that the bandwidth would be unregulated. Is it just a matter of time before standards and assignments develop and Neul's "Weightless" gets bumped out?

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