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Space Log: Props for our robo-explorers

George Leopold
8/10/2011 05:59 PM EDT

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Tiger Joe
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re: Space Log: Props for our robo-explorers
Tiger Joe   8/31/2011 6:22:42 PM
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Don't forget the grand-daddy of them all the James Webb Telescope, Hubble's successor. There has been much criticism over its total cost and schedule, but generally the payback for robotic missions is great. The best obviously being that of our Mars Opportunity Rover

DrQuine
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re: Space Log: Props for our robo-explorers
DrQuine   8/16/2011 3:14:40 PM
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The media fail to clearly communicate that while exploration of the entire earth was simply a matter of time, manned exploration of the universe is not physically possible because of the time required to travel the tremendous distances. Our moon is the only other body in the solar system that is easily reached in a reasonable amount of time. Unmanned and remote sensing technologies are necessary tools in exploration of the universe even if they lack the personal drama of "setting foot" in a new place.

george.leopold
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re: Space Log: Props for our robo-explorers
george.leopold   8/15/2011 1:31:18 PM
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And the Mars Science Laboratory, or Curiosity, is scheduled to land on the Red Planet in August 2012.

Duane Benson
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re: Space Log: Props for our robo-explorers
Duane Benson   8/12/2011 6:02:18 PM
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There's also the Dawn spacecraft. The first to orbit an asteroid. It's started its year of orbiting around Vesta and after that, will go on to over to Ceres.

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