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Memristor brouhaha bubbles under

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Blaise
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re: Memristor brouhaha bubbles under
Blaise   5/4/2012 2:50:42 PM
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I recently did a SPICE simulation to show that a linear resistor in parallel with a non-linear capacitor can also produce the pinched hysteresis effect (see link). http://vixra.org/abs/1205.0008 Thus pinched hysteresis cannot be considered as evidence of a "fourth fundamental circuit element" as claimed.

Volatile Memory
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re: Memristor brouhaha bubbles under
Volatile Memory   2/16/2012 1:46:47 PM
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Oops. Mr. Williams is in trouble now.

Blaise
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re: Memristor brouhaha bubbles under
Blaise   2/16/2012 3:21:11 AM
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My rebuttal to HP's rebuttal is available at http://www.scribd.com/doc/79648334/Memristor-Scientific-Method

Peter Clarke
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re: Memristor brouhaha bubbles under
Peter Clarke   1/20/2012 4:17:54 PM
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HP has responded to the discussion about the memristor. See http://www.eetimes.com/electronics-news/4234963/HP-responds-to-memristor-debate

resistion
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re: Memristor brouhaha bubbles under
resistion   1/20/2012 5:08:27 AM
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Interesting! But if amorphous this effect would disappear?

R G.Neale
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re: Memristor brouhaha bubbles under
R G.Neale   1/19/2012 5:06:23 PM
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rbtbob-It looks interesting. I think you will find in the literature some PCM work using sub-lattice of very thin (angstroms)conductors. These were proposed, and experimental evidence presented to show application as a multi-level cell (MLC-PCM) memory device. From memory (mine)the mechanism was based on expanding the thermal core to phase change the sub-lattice chalcogenide layers. Imagine if you will a number of PCMs stacked in series in a single two terminal structure. In the reference you cite there is a statement, room temperature and higher??? I assume the orientation of the sub lattice layers is magnetic spin not crystal orientation. I suppose if they execute a phase change they could change the orientation. Other than materials how would be used incorporating a phase change. Above some of the discussion has been on classification. Where would this one fit?

rbtbob
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re: Memristor brouhaha bubbles under
rbtbob   1/19/2012 3:54:43 PM
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Here is a peculiar Ge-Te-Sb materials development. Maybe one of you techies can translate it into popular science dialect: http://www.nanowerk.com/news/newsid=23999.php

R G.Neale
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re: Memristor brouhaha bubbles under
R G.Neale   1/19/2012 3:49:00 PM
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I would like to add from private correspondence with with Blaise Mouttet, he admonishes me: "Incidentally, it is trivial to convert example 4 of my paper from a volatile to a non-volatile dynamic system by including a crystallization rate equation thus forming a 2nd order dynamic system. This has been discussed in phase change modeling literature by David Wright and in terms of memristive systems by DiVentra and Pershin." He is also of the opinion: "This is not simply a debate on semantics or classification of "memristor". In my view this entire memristor fiasco is a direct attack on the scientific method. If scientists are going around claiming they have discovered an example of a memristor (or any other theoretical concept, e.g. Higgs boson, etc.) they need to rigorously prove that their claims have scientific validity and show comparisons between experimental data and theoretical models. This has not been done for the so-called "memristor" claims of HPLabs and it is a(expletive deleted)disgrace.

kalpak
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re: Memristor brouhaha bubbles under
kalpak   1/19/2012 6:03:10 AM
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@Bob Lacovara Well said!

Bob Lacovara
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re: Memristor brouhaha bubbles under
Bob Lacovara   1/18/2012 11:37:41 PM
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Watching this topic over the years, I've been puzzled by the firefight between two armed camps: "it's a new thing" and "it's not a new thing". I just don't understand all of the heat. However, what does it matter? If the devices are useful, fill a niche, or enable something else, they are valuable. If they really aren't useful by reason of cost, or performance, or what-have-you, what does it matter how a memristor is classified?

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