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How Samsung stole Apple’s lead

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SiliconAsia
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re: How Samsung stole Apple’s lead
SiliconAsia   7/17/2012 12:55:45 AM
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I recently switched from iPhone 4S to Galaxy note and I love its bigger screen. I can't read what's in iPhone anymore...

cybernaut
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re: How Samsung stole Apple’s lead
cybernaut   7/17/2012 12:15:32 AM
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Samsung is on to something particularily for asia -its a 'Face' thing. Back in the day the 'Motorola Brick Phone' was a favorite around HK, it was a status symbol easily recognisable confidently dumped on the YUM CHA tables at the best restuarants for all to see. Enter the Samsung Note, I am betting same thing goes with this device, its clearly visible, its distinctive and it gets attention from passing patrons. I have a Note and even though I am not in asia it gets comments for the same reason. Yes it has some technical advantages but in the end it may be all about status and 'face'.

ruserious
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re: How Samsung stole Apple’s lead
ruserious   7/16/2012 11:21:36 PM
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The young man you spoke to in the Hong Kong subway must have had HUGE pockets! An iPhone barely fits in my pocket. No possible way I would get a Galaxy in there.

lcovey
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re: How Samsung stole Apple’s lead
lcovey   7/16/2012 10:54:49 PM
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This begs the question, though: If Apple sells only one type of phone with one type of OS, can you actually compare the sales to a competitor that sells multiple variations with multiple OS's? Isn't it more accurate to compare Samsung's best selling phone to the iPhone?

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