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Oldest digital computer brought back to life

Colin Holland
11/21/2012 03:40 PM EST

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mike_m
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re: Oldest digital computer brought back to life
mike_m   11/27/2012 6:46:18 PM
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Incredible that this computer can survive more than half a century and 2 of My new dell desktops die within a year of unboxing.

GeLy-MyOtherRideIsABMWS1000RRScooter
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re: Oldest digital computer brought back to life
GeLy-MyOtherRideIsABMWS1000RRScooter   11/26/2012 4:46:33 PM
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Why no mentioning of any benchmark # :)

dyson_
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re: Oldest digital computer brought back to life
dyson_   11/23/2012 4:31:55 PM
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Mike It looks like Wikipedia has some of the info

TarraTarra!
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re: Oldest digital computer brought back to life
TarraTarra!   11/22/2012 2:11:28 AM
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Just curious - how many Hz does it run at and how many bits wide are the datapaths, what storage does it have. Amazing how far we have come in half a century.

jonnydoin
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re: Oldest digital computer brought back to life
jonnydoin   11/22/2012 12:48:38 AM
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I'll certainly do that! I'm going to be in London next February and BP is one of my major places to go. What would be nice is if visitors could bring their own paper tapes and run programs on it! - Jonny

Navelpluis
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re: Oldest digital computer brought back to life
Navelpluis   11/21/2012 7:48:09 PM
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This is a very great achievement. As frequent visitors @ BP we already have seen parts of it, all collected and restored, amazing. This museum is very interesting for a visit, so if you are in the neighborhood of London, please drive 40 miles up and visit BP.

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