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How small is too small?

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Hampus Jakobsson
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re: How small is too small?
Hampus Jakobsson   8/1/2009 11:42:49 AM
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I think you are right. The smallest mobile phones were done around 2002, with for example the Sony Premini being the pinnacle of smallness. The size constraint is a human factors constraint just as you mention, and size used to be a technical issue. Now it is really depending on how you interact with the device. As long as mobile phones can't "transform" (look at the classical Nokia N93) or let the user interface be more adaptive (why not have a device which can only answer and call via voice recognition looking like a handsfree) they will be limited by the accuracy of our eyes and size of fingers. As voice recognition, projected user interfaces, adaptive user interfaces, dedicated devices matures we will have more useful and smaller devices. One day we might not have to look at technology any more, but it will be invisible or super natural - think of how mucn credit cards for example have abstracted in technology and fuss.

clicklead
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re: How small is too small?
clicklead   7/28/2009 11:51:09 PM
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Without glsses I see clearly at 8 feet. I need the phone to be small enough to be part of my pace maker so my brain can operate it. GB.

rich.nass
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re: How small is too small?
rich.nass   7/28/2009 11:47:07 AM
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I agree that it's gotten too hard to dial a number on these tiny devices. I have a Blackberry, and it's very difficult just to see the letters on the keys. Pressing just one key at a time is another matter.

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