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I'm starting to feel sorry for and worry about Apple--not because of their iPhone RF problem

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Bob Lacovara
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re: I'm starting to feel sorry for and worry about Apple--not because of their iPhone RF problem
Bob Lacovara   8/17/2010 5:16:01 PM
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You're kidding me. A court wasted time on a decision forcing Victorinox to allow a 3rd party to manufacture a knife? I hope that's not the sort of "new opportunities" consumer protection laws engender. I'll call those sorts of new opportunities "piracy" instead.

Etmax
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re: I'm starting to feel sorry for and worry about Apple--not because of their iPhone RF problem
Etmax   8/17/2010 2:26:07 AM
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Quite frankly my experience over the years is that the small shops do an infinitely better job at the service and repair of cars, doing it both cheaper and better. The large dealerships employ on price alone (usually apprentices) and rush the service with things like sump plugs left off and others to numerous to mention here (actual experience!) As we have right to repair laws (Australia) the consumer gets the best deal. Once I got a quote for $700 from the carmaker's dealership and got the job done for less than $40 form an independant. It was a radiator hose. This is why monopolies are evil.

Etmax
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re: I'm starting to feel sorry for and worry about Apple--not because of their iPhone RF problem
Etmax   8/17/2010 2:16:03 AM
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We have right to repair laws in Australia and have had for some years. I got HP to send me a service manual for a logic analyser so I could repair it, and the automotive industry is no different. I doesn't have to free, but at a commercially viable rate. It's all about monopolies not being legal. In fact Victorinox had to allow another company to manufacture their fabled Swiss army pocket knife to be allowed to continue to sell it. I think it's a good way to protect the consumer, and it doesn't put anyone out of business, but rather creates new opportunities.

ee_guy1234
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re: I'm starting to feel sorry for and worry about Apple--not because of their iPhone RF problem
ee_guy1234   8/11/2010 8:07:47 PM
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Dear Bill, Are you sure your article interprets the ruling correctly? I thought that the ruling said that it was 'fair use' legal for a customer to monkey with the phone they bought with their money and now own. All it says is that customers who crack open their phone wont be liable for criminal prosecution under the DMCA. Nothing I saw said Apple had to make it easy. Or make it hard. I dont think it imposed any duty on Apple. Your article seems to be a little off target to me. Just my $0.02. Regards, K.

willie 2000
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re: I'm starting to feel sorry for and worry about Apple--not because of their iPhone RF problem
willie 2000   8/11/2010 1:38:35 PM
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Nowadays Corporation main aim is to make profit. Without regulation on Safety and RF/EMI, most corporation will cut corners, and market their products. Recent BP oil disaster is an example. So Apple is not facing more regulatory agencies requirements, Apple just has to face the same safety and EMI standards that every corporation has to meet (in the market that Apple chose to play), without exception. Willie

Bob Lacovara
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re: I'm starting to feel sorry for and worry about Apple--not because of their iPhone RF problem
Bob Lacovara   8/2/2010 3:22:55 PM
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Ran out of space in my comment, but I'd like to add that I picked Toyota and Honda because I own two of one of them, and family have the other... both makers produce vehicles that don't normally need much more than gas and oil... my point being, entirely, that companies should be free to pursue any (legal) strategy they'd like in the market. The market will then tell them whether or not their choice was correct.

Bob Lacovara
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re: I'm starting to feel sorry for and worry about Apple--not because of their iPhone RF problem
Bob Lacovara   8/2/2010 3:20:07 PM
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I don't mind arguing, at least a little... Mr. Schweber's article brings up a few points worth tossing back and forth. Government regulation is a two-edged sword. Yes, consumer protection is a valuable function. No, deciding what a product does is not. That's the market's job. "Right to Repair"? Nonsense. Let's say Toyota and Honda take diametrically opposed positions. Toyota makes all of their internal diagnostics and interface available in a spec, and anyone who wishes can get a suitably equipped diagnostic unit for the cost of a cheap laptop. Honda goes the other route: basically, all work that needs access to the car's data bus must be done at a dealership. The government keeps its nose out. What happens? Toyota and Honda are vehicles of comparable reliability and quality. But consumers find out quickly that a Toyota can be repaired anywhere, but Honda is not so easy. So for folks who value maintenance, Toyota gets a boost. Now we take the question of the shop itself. The factory folks are trained, etc... the corner garage isn't. The car owner will find out quite quickly who can repair his car, and who can't. And that takes care of that issue. The government can butt out: the car owner can be relied upon to take care of the issue.

tpfj
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re: I'm starting to feel sorry for and worry about Apple--not because of their iPhone RF problem
tpfj   8/2/2010 3:02:44 PM
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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=juytk2OA4GI and http://www.paconsulting.com/our-thinking/pa-consulting-group-iphone-antenna-test-results/

eewiz
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re: I'm starting to feel sorry for and worry about Apple--not because of their iPhone RF problem
eewiz   7/29/2010 2:43:31 AM
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Bureaucrats ,Government Agencies.. This is not an Apple only problem. Every other handset manufacturer has to go through the same process. Considering that customers always pay a premium for apple products, one would expect them to sort out these issues better than their competitors. Again most of the time, exploration of tradeoffs between different features is NOT limited by the FCC kinda agencies; unless it is relating to transmission/reception itself.

Charles.Desassure
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re: I'm starting to feel sorry for and worry about Apple--not because of their iPhone RF problem
Charles.Desassure   7/29/2010 12:25:41 AM
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Thanks for your article Bill Schweber . Trust me, donít worry about Apple Corporation. Apple will be just fine. Besides Appleís iPhone and other devices; Apple software is used by every art, digital, and multi-media program at the college level in the Country. They also use the iPhone to teach distance education courses. The Library of Congress is a great place to visit, but they are always far behind the eight ball. Or, by the way, many of the personnelís at the Library of Congress and those that serve in Congress use the Apple iPhone too. Apple will continue to do well.

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