Design Con 2015
Breaking News
Blog

Apple iPhone 4: Can't engineers just say no?

Karen Field
7/29/2010 09:14 PM EDT

 16 comments   post a comment
NO RATINGS
View Comments: Newest First | Oldest First | Threaded View
Page 1 / 2   >   >>
IqbalSingh.Josan
User Rank
Rookie
re: Apple iPhone 4: Can't engineers just say no?
IqbalSingh.Josan   8/13/2010 8:59:07 PM
NO RATINGS
Engineers definitely have the right to say "no". Please refer IEEE Code of Ethics for engineers at this link: http://www.ieee.org/membership_services/membership/ethics_code.html Unfortunately, due to job insecurity, engineers may tend to compromise on ethics due to pressure from PMs and executive management. A good strategy is to communicate in writing to management the risks associated and let management make the final decision. Anyway managers are ultimately responsible for business decisions. But as professional engineers we must adhere to code of ethics under all circumstances. Visit us at uspurtek.com

Gaiussmith
User Rank
Rookie
re: Apple iPhone 4: Can't engineers just say no?
Gaiussmith   8/6/2010 11:58:51 AM
NO RATINGS
I have an iPhone and absolutely love it! I also get tired of phones quickly, but I haven't got tired of this one. iPhones Rock! It is definitely the coolest phone out there at the moment. http://www.articlesbase.com/health-articles/idol-lash-review-does-idol-lash-eyelash-growth-enhancer-work-2322867.html

wilber_xbox
User Rank
Manager
re: Apple iPhone 4: Can't engineers just say no?
wilber_xbox   8/4/2010 11:18:42 AM
NO RATINGS
It is truly amazing to find and read so many articles on iPhone 4. First, the (apparent) leak of the iPhone 4 before its official release ( by the way, it was a good PR stunt...iPhone got all the attention without Apple spending a single penny). Now, this problem (or no problem) of the antenna design. I have read many articles, theories and conspiracies. Some article claim that Apple knew about this antenna problem but Steve Job liked the design so much that no-one raised the red flag or push the stop button. Steve Job even defended the antenna design by saying that the same problem is faced by other mobile manufacturers (i think RIM and other companies even denied Job's claim)...this article raises a valid question whether engineers should have more say in the product design. IMO in the consumer product market, the engineers will have a little say in the final design. Their opinions will be listened, documented and passed on to the marketing department.

prabhakar_deosthali
User Rank
CEO
re: Apple iPhone 4: Can't engineers just say no?
prabhakar_deosthali   8/3/2010 5:42:55 PM
NO RATINGS
I as an R & D engineer fully subscribe to the view that Engineers are always pressurized to say "yes" when they actually want to say "No". This has happened on the projects and products on which I worked. This is the result of over-commitment to the market and customers by the management/marketing. In an Automation project in which I was the development engineer, I was overruled by my manager when I voiced concern about inadequate testing before shipping the system to the customer. Later I had to spend almost a month at the customer site to re-tune the motion control PID parameters to meet the customer's requirements. And it earned a bad name for the company too.

tpfj
User Rank
CEO
re: Apple iPhone 4: Can't engineers just say no?
tpfj   8/2/2010 3:00:55 PM
NO RATINGS
http://www.paconsulting.com/our-thinking/pa-consulting-group-iphone-antenna-test-results/ http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=juytk2OA4GI

DrQuine
User Rank
CEO
re: Apple iPhone 4: Can't engineers just say no?
DrQuine   7/31/2010 11:54:30 PM
NO RATINGS
It seems to me that the most likely explanation is being missed. IF you hold an iPhone 4 in your left hand (especially if that hand is very conductive) in a certain position when you are in an area of marginal signal strength then the antenna loses effectiveness. Once the YouTube video shows us how, we can all reproduce the scenario and it seems obvious. I believe that if this clear evidence had been presented to Apple management before launch of the product that it would have been addressed without any hesitation. The challenge is that such problems can be hard to find until a million people are playing with the device 24/7. Not everything is engineers vs. management. Sometimes troublesome scenarios are hard to find in advance. With the clarity of 20/20 hindsight, I do suspect that the test protocols will be revised based upon this lesson learned.

MikeLC
User Rank
Rookie
re: Apple iPhone 4: Can't engineers just say no?
MikeLC   7/31/2010 10:47:06 PM
NO RATINGS
Yes, that is a good question. I agree, more data is needed. I have to chuckle though, regarding the VP Martinez's comment on "misguided job-security fears" Many of us, who've been around, see that there are plenty of companies who will fire folks for telling the truth. Of course these types of companies don't survive long.

WKetel
User Rank
Rookie
re: Apple iPhone 4: Can't engineers just say no?
WKetel   7/30/2010 10:28:53 PM
NO RATINGS
The big question in my mind is what are they calling a failure? My guess is that the problem is a few to many neurotic types seeing that there were not as many segments displayed on the signal strength indicator as they liked, and so, like all technical illiterate types, they presumed a failure. I don't recall haering anything about dropped calls, which is what I classify as a failure. And of course the news media grabbed it and ran. Does anybody recall that old rock song "Dirty Laundry". It seems to fit in this case.

sg007
User Rank
Rookie
re: Apple iPhone 4: Can't engineers just say no?
sg007   7/30/2010 9:09:10 PM
NO RATINGS
@lcovey: 37% is not a failure rate, its just an opinion of the users on what was the apparent issue. As an engineer and an iphone 4 user I have in rare circumstances observed the said problem, with no effect on call quality. So my vote goes to "Its a PR issue". Then again I don't have much comments on the contents of the article. What I am saying is the data has been misrepresented dividing it up in smaller bins so that it appears that majority thinks its it was an "engineers not getting enough time" issue. Which of course is always good to hear for us engineers. Even if backed by questionable numbers.

katgod
User Rank
Rookie
re: Apple iPhone 4: Can't engineers just say no?
katgod   7/30/2010 8:51:23 PM
NO RATINGS
The answer to Icovey is no, although you should explain the term failure rate, is this catastrophic, hard reset required, soft error rate, or other. As an example, most SSDs and HDs have an allowable soft error rates and at present this is number not dictated by any government agency that I am aware of.

Page 1 / 2   >   >>
Radio
LATEST ARCHIVED BROADCAST
EE Times Senior Technical Editor Martin Rowe will interview EMC engineer Kenneth Wyatt.
Top Comments of the Week
Like Us on Facebook

Datasheets.com Parts Search

185 million searchable parts
(please enter a part number or hit search to begin)
EE Times on Twitter
EE Times Twitter Feed
Flash Poll