Breaking News
Blog

The nose knows what we don't: is "smell" the final transducer frontier?

NO RATINGS
View Comments: Newest First | Oldest First | Threaded View
Etmax
User Rank
Rookie
re: The nose knows what we don't: is "smell" the final transducer frontier?
Etmax   10/27/2010 12:54:26 PM
NO RATINGS
Thanks!!

Etmax
User Rank
Rookie
re: The nose knows what we don't: is "smell" the final transducer frontier?
Etmax   10/27/2010 12:53:17 PM
NO RATINGS
Yes and dogs have been known to be able to smell disease in their owners. Imagine being able to go to the doctor for a quick sniff!

pmoyle111
User Rank
Rookie
re: The nose knows what we don't: is "smell" the final transducer frontier?
pmoyle111   10/6/2010 6:56:40 PM
NO RATINGS
The thing that came to my mind almost immediately was bomb sniffing. With places that are infested with land mines, a device that could smell different explosives signatures placed on a miniature hovering craft could allow vast areas to be swept from a remote command/control center.

ylshih
User Rank
Rookie
re: The nose knows what we don't: is "smell" the final transducer frontier?
ylshih   10/1/2010 6:19:07 AM
NO RATINGS
If we categorize the traditional five senses: sight, sound, smell, taste and touch; their physical manifestations are apparently photons, acoustic waves, chemical/molecular, protein/ion and pressure/strain detections. Photons, acoustic waves and pressure/strain detectors have some maturity and have been amenable to semiconductor implementations. The other two appear to be in a completely different direction of development and have the further difficulty that their characteristics are more complex. For example photons are characterized by frequency and intensity (flux), as is sound, just two factors. Molecules are much more complex with molecular formula, weight, radical groups, shape, acidity, reactivity, concentration, and so on; so the trick will be figuring out which of these characteristics, hopefully not all, are necessary identifiers. Here's a link to some research on an electronic nose: http://nsl.caltech.edu/research:nose

Silicon_Smith
User Rank
Rookie
re: The nose knows what we don't: is "smell" the final transducer frontier?
Silicon_Smith   9/30/2010 3:31:33 PM
NO RATINGS
I think it can be put to good use! Especially the sense of smell, if an underlying fundamental or base ingredients, can be found. To sense as well reproduce all the smells to extreme details (High Resolution Fragrances?)can be used in all the devices which bring sight and sound to us. Imagine being able to smell the fragrant flowers while watching a garden on screen.

prabhakar_deosthali
User Rank
CEO
re: The nose knows what we don't: is "smell" the final transducer frontier?
prabhakar_deosthali   9/30/2010 5:52:38 AM
NO RATINGS
What I think is that like color, sound where we have been able to find the basic elements , we should also be able to find the basic elements of what constitutes a smell. In Color we have just three basic colors Red Green and Blue and we have the whole universe of the color under our control. In sound we have just seven basic notes and we are able compose/decompose any complex sound. Both of these senses are frequency based. Similar basis needs to be found for smell. detection and reproduction of exact smell can open up a variety of new applications. Especially those Recipe shows on TV can increase their TRP if the smell and flavour of the recipe being cooked in the studio can reach the taste buds of the viewers

ChrisGammell
User Rank
Rookie
re: The nose knows what we don't: is "smell" the final transducer frontier?
ChrisGammell   9/29/2010 8:12:22 PM
NO RATINGS
When you think about the nose as a transducer, it is not one but many many transducers that have evolved over the course of thousands of years. As such, I think it'll be the long slow slog you mention. We'll find a receptor that can understand what an apple smells like, but not an orange. I think the eventual transducer will be groups of many individual sensors. However, I do think that advances in biological and electrical crossover circuits will aid in this manner. My real question would be: what is the need for a smell measurement device? It's very human in nature but I can't think of many direct uses that can't be worked around with non-humanesque types of stimulus detection.

Flash Poll
Radio
LATEST ARCHIVED BROADCAST
EE Times editor Junko Yoshida grills two executives --Rick Walker, senior product marketing manager for IoT and home automation for CSR, and Jim Reich, CTO and co-founder at Palatehome.
Like Us on Facebook

Datasheets.com Parts Search

185 million searchable parts
(please enter a part number or hit search to begin)
EE Times on Twitter
EE Times Twitter Feed
Top Comments of the Week