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The engineering consultant who didn't do his job

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10/21/2010 11:08 PM EDT

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Salio
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re: The engineering consultant who didn't do his job
Salio   11/15/2010 1:15:54 AM
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I think the title of the article doesn't seem to match the body of the article. Given that the consultant probably should have tested more to ensure the results he was getting are valid. However, to completely dismiss him is not fair either. After all he came up with the so called solution that the EE refined. We have to give him credit for coming up with the solution. I wonder what have happened if the consultant didn't come up with the solution?????

Joshua.Jones
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re: The engineering consultant who didn't do his job
Joshua.Jones   11/2/2010 1:33:37 PM
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Much depends on why the consultant is there and who decided that he or she was necessary. Management ineptitude seems to me to be tolerated to a degree that would have long seen any consultant or engineer dismissed for it. Bad feeling between engineers needing help and consultants doing their best to give it smells strongly of inept management. Good engineers welcome all the help they can get and give as much as they can. Only bad ones hug their knowledge to themselves and try to outdo their colleagues by withholding information. I know the breed and have no time for them in any role.

UdaraW
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re: The engineering consultant who didn't do his job
UdaraW   10/29/2010 6:52:28 AM
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This is one tricky story to interpret. Generally, a consultant comes into an organization to bring upon a new perspective that regular workers might oversee This the reason why consultants exist and this consultant has done so. He has given a fresh perspective to a solution. Pursuing the consultants’ hint, an internal engineer has solved the problem which is great. That is what is to be expected. If the consultant has merely come in as an external pair of eyes, he has done his job. It is rather too optimistic to expect an external consultant (who is not an engineering expert) to practically solve an engineering problem for you, However, if this consultant has presented himself as an engineering expert, it is not very smart of him to deliver untested solutions, and quite childish of him to expect to publish on such. I strongly believe that if you present yourself as an expert, you have to be one. Ideally, such engineering expert should be heads and shoulders above the internal staff engineers if they are to be contracted to solve engineering problems. Therefore, in my opinion, the problem is with the people who make such decisions and neither with the staff-engineer or the consultant. While there are many ways to interpret the story, I have to disagree with Silicon_Smith that consultants are always gold diggers on other peoples hardships. They come in useful at times, the company has to be wise enough to contract the correct person at correct times. In my view, the call is with the management.

Charles J Gervasi
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re: The engineering consultant who didn't do his job
Charles J Gervasi   10/27/2010 6:42:36 PM
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"My experience has been that it pays to verify ones results prior to telling others about them. Also, if a solution seems "almost to good to be true", it may well be that it is not true. " This reminds me of Fleischmann and Pons cold fusion claim 20 years ago.

Silicon_Smith
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re: The engineering consultant who didn't do his job
Silicon_Smith   10/27/2010 4:47:26 PM
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" Hiring a consultant is an excellent way of turning problems into gold. Your problems into their gold."

agk
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re: The engineering consultant who didn't do his job
agk   10/27/2010 10:54:04 AM
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Dear William Ketel when i read the few lines of this application the first thing came to my mind is to conect a mobile phone vibrator motor or solenoid on the metal sheet and test it!

z1
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re: The engineering consultant who didn't do his job
z1   10/26/2010 7:04:12 PM
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Thanks Ketel - sorry on my harsh comment. I was reacting to the article header and tagline which penalized someone for coming up with a good idea. I understand the article better after reading your comment. I agree the consultant should have done the research and work completely before claiming glory.

Neo10
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re: The engineering consultant who didn't do his job
Neo10   10/26/2010 6:31:45 AM
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This author is most probably a newbie in his area but with some good fundamentals. This should have been aptly titled as "how to learn from others mistakes"

David Ashton
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re: The engineering consultant who didn't do his job
David Ashton   10/24/2010 11:01:24 PM
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Actually it's about both. It's a good engineering investigation and could just as easily have been in that column. But Mr Ketel remarks at the end of the piece that "the division manager continued to believe that “all engineers are interchangeable,”" It's this guy who I take strong exception to, not the consultant. People like this do their companies far more harm than sloppy consultants ever can.

labnet
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re: The engineering consultant who didn't do his job
labnet   10/24/2010 10:47:21 PM
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I chuckled when I read at the beggining of the story. 'The challenge was to do this fast, and with as little expense as possible' which immediadately triggered the old saying. Time, Quality, Price. Pick two!

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