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Migrating from Windows XP to Windows 7

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Max The Magnificent
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re: Migrating from Windows XP to Windows 7
Max The Magnificent   12/14/2010 3:12:32 PM
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Cool Beans -- I'm glad this proved to be useful to you -- please keep us informed as to how you get on -- regards -- Max

MrSean
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re: Migrating from Windows XP to Windows 7
MrSean   12/14/2010 12:59:05 PM
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Thank you so much for this article! I bought Zinstall XP7 and it migrated my old computer to a new one - its exactly what I was looking for and it saved me a lot of time. So thanks again!!!

Max The Magnificent
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re: Migrating from Windows XP to Windows 7
Max The Magnificent   12/9/2010 7:12:53 PM
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Cool Beans (as we French say). The main thing is that i like to see old technology used for something rather than simply being thrown away on the scrap heap. The other thing I've found is that every snippet of information is useful to someone -- I bet someone reading your post will say "Ah Ha! I could do that..."

Engineer62
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re: Migrating from Windows XP to Windows 7
Engineer62   12/9/2010 6:33:57 PM
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A bit off-topic but perhaps of some interest... A charity my wife supports was given two tower PC's, both 2.7GHz machines with 40 GB HD's, CD drive, NIC, etc. Not exactly cutting edge but no slouch on easy office stuff and the Internet. Problem was they both ran Windows 2000 and were password protected... and the donors were nowhere to be found! Unwilling to pay a tech wiz (not me!) to defeat the passwords and knowing Win 2000 was obsolete anyway (and not willing to buy a Windows 7 license), I downloaded the free Linux-Ubuntu 10.10 and loaded it onto both machines (very easy). It has OpenOffice embedded in it and will do anything they want to do. Problem solved. Cheers, Roger

rfindley
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re: Migrating from Windows XP to Windows 7
rfindley   12/9/2010 4:12:56 PM
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Aside from a few quibbles I have with Win7, my transition from XP was super smooth. I combined ShadowProtect software with VMWare to make the transition. ShadowProtect is a backup software. Its backup images are directly bootable as a virtual machine (VM). So, I simply use the last backup of my XP machine, and boot it up in a window on my Win7 machine any time I need to access an app or data that I haven't transitioned yet. The VMs are supported by several freeware VM players... I use VMware. Not sure about the others, but in VMware, I can drap-n-drop files between the VM window and the host (Win7) desktop. Or, instead of booting the VM, I can mount the old XP drives as a new drive or subfolder. Also, since the VM retains the same MAC address and HardDrive S/Ns as the old hardware, my node-locked software licenses still work inside the VM. Hardware license keys also work inside the VM if your VM player supports USB. We also use VMs for old software that doesn't run on a newer OS.

Max The Magnificent
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re: Migrating from Windows XP to Windows 7
Max The Magnificent   12/9/2010 3:33:43 PM
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The funny thing is that i can remember a time when I said that I'd never use my credit card online ... now I do so all the time ... so it will be interesting to see how my position re "The Cloud" changes (or not) over the next 10+ years...

rfindley
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re: Migrating from Windows XP to Windows 7
rfindley   12/9/2010 3:20:29 PM
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I have to agree, Max. All the big players (Google, MS, etc) are pushing for storing things "in the cloud", and more-or-less doing away with local storage. I'll never take that plunge unless everything is encrypted before leaving my computer, and I must be the only one that has the encryption key. So if the cloud ever gets hacked, all the data is useless to the hacker (unless s/he somehow manages to hold the data and all backups hostage, I suppose). Of course, that's a problem for people prone to losing their keys... but there are solutions for that, too.

Max The Magnificent
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re: Migrating from Windows XP to Windows 7
Max The Magnificent   12/8/2010 2:50:41 PM
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I know someone who used that "Carbon" service and he said that when it came to recover his files things didn't work as well as he had hoped (actually he used rather stronger words, but I think you get my drift). The thing I worry about stuffing all my data into the cloud is someone accessing private information -- I write for lots of different companies and have access to lots of confidential information on my machine...

Max The Magnificent
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re: Migrating from Windows XP to Windows 7
Max The Magnificent   12/8/2010 2:47:51 PM
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The thing is that a lot of folks don't know enough to go around sharing folders and suchlike -- that's why having a piece of software that did the sharing thing for you automatically would be handy.

eewiz
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re: Migrating from Windows XP to Windows 7
eewiz   12/8/2010 5:02:00 AM
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The idea is really low tech Max. I use a service called Dropbox. Syncs all my files across my Office & home PCs. The data backup is always available in the cloud, so if I need to get the files on a new computer, just install the client and the files are automatically synced to the new Computer. Also they have an iOS client, so can access all the files from my phone too, on the go. other similar services are Sugarsync/Windows LiveMesh http://explore.live.com/windows-live-mesh?os=other https://www.sugarsync.com/

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