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Are "zombie" expressions causing confusion for your audience?

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Patk0317
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re: Are "zombie" expressions causing confusion for your audience?
Patk0317   1/13/2011 3:34:20 AM
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I was presenting with a friend in Japan some years ago. He was talking about the "lexicon of options" available in our chip's I/Os. Everyone there (who did not know English), thought he was talking about a car. In general in that situation, I try to follow the bullet points on a slide almost exactly, because non-English speakers tend to read English much better then they hear it.

WKetel
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re: Are "zombie" expressions causing confusion for your audience?
WKetel   1/12/2011 9:14:05 PM
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An additional insight is that we need to be very careful about using analogy terms that may seem excessively emphatic. I discovered this after making a presentation where several individuals immediately discarded all suggestions that "seemed to contain any emotion". This is just one more case of the unknowing ignoring information. We need to be careful to avoid this failure mode as well.

WKetel
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re: Are "zombie" expressions causing confusion for your audience?
WKetel   1/6/2011 3:03:16 AM
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It seems that many phrases are created by extreme, intense intellectual laziness, including input and output as verbs, and the always stupid "actionable", as in "actionable information". The worst part is that the media aid these lazy people by also using the same stupid expressions, probably in an attempt to appear to be current with their language. So yes, there are a lot of people using both obsolete expressions and just plain lazy construction of the language. It may have come from some of the less-good teachers in the Detroit school system.

johntech
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re: Are "zombie" expressions causing confusion for your audience?
johntech   1/5/2011 4:31:17 PM
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A few examples are here:- http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kAG39jKi0lI (well worth watching)

Geometeer
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re: Are "zombie" expressions causing confusion for your audience?
Geometeer   1/5/2011 8:59:36 AM
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A lot of the words we use are unnoticed zombie metaphors: how many shuttle bus riders have seen a shuttle working on a loom? How many anxious people have seen tenterhooks? (Cloth on tenterhooks is _very_ tight.) The word "Calculus" means "little stone", from the stones used in the ancient Roman abacus. (They didn't compute with numbers like XVII, they just wrote them down that way. They calculated with calculi. Kidney stones are also calculi, to a doctor.) "Alias" just meant "otherwise" in Latin: it specialized to "alternative name for criminal purposes", and is now dropping the criminality. ("AKA","also known as", is taking over the narrower niche.) Language changes. We cannot know the origins of all the words we use, so 'zombies' are harmless in themselves -- as long as everybody knows the current meaning of Calculus, the old stones don't matter. Using "gay" to mean "light-hearted" could cause confusion, but not because light-heartedness is old tech.

prabhakar_deosthali
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CEO
re: Are "zombie" expressions causing confusion for your audience?
prabhakar_deosthali   12/27/2010 5:19:14 AM
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The term "shipment"is also many times misused even though the cargo is being transported by Air or road. The courier companies misuse the term "Air-way-bill" even though the documents are being delivered by road transport. We in India still use the old term "kitne baje? "( in our language Hindi - it means how many bells sounded?) to ask what time it is . This is based upon the old practice of sounding the bell every hour from a public place to let the people around know the time.( No of bells equals the time)

NickPDA
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re: Are "zombie" expressions causing confusion for your audience?
NickPDA   12/22/2010 3:27:34 PM
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"... ask some chinese coworker how they say "thing". Do they still ork cows in China? I thought it was now illegal. Thank heavens for hyphens in English. And why, when I see the words, "Made in China", do I immediately think, "unless it's the cheap model, in which case it's probably Made in Plastic".

b_s_anoop
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re: Are "zombie" expressions causing confusion for your audience?
b_s_anoop   12/18/2010 5:32:13 PM
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"hanging up the phone" is one phrase which comes to my mind.. This term is normally used with wall mounted fixed line phones.. But, even when conversing on a mobile the same phrase is often used

katgod
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re: Are "zombie" expressions causing confusion for your audience?
katgod   12/17/2010 4:04:06 AM
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And I thought tape out meant that you used black tape to produce a large photo mask for your PCB (not Polychlorinated Biphenyls)

jlinstrom
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re: Are "zombie" expressions causing confusion for your audience?
jlinstrom   12/16/2010 5:36:45 PM
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In response to a product fix that entailed shipping some cable parts and instructions to clients, I said we didn't want this fix to end up looking like a 'Heathkit'. I'm 60.The S/W engr.is 30, Prod. Mgr is BA(biz) and 32. No wonder I got stares...

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