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The myth of parental controls

David Blaza
1/8/2011 00:53 AM EST

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Brian Fuller2
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re: The myth of parental controls
Brian Fuller2   1/15/2011 12:03:08 AM
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Thanks for the encouragement, folks! This weekend will be easy: Heading to the mountains, off the grid completely, no electricity, no wireless, but a few chainsaws. Trey, I'm interested in hearing your feedback on your charging valet. Those look highly useful!

Stephen.Sywak
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re: The myth of parental controls
Stephen.Sywak   1/14/2011 11:17:18 PM
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WHen my son was 14, I had installed NetNanny on our main (household) desktop computer. When he complained that he was getting a "funny screen" when trying to access certain sites, I told him, "That's because you're not supposed to access those sites!" He soon figured out that something (probably DAD) was actively keeping him off those sites. A little while later, he told me "Dad, you might as well take that program off, I found a way to get around it!" And he showed me! I sat down next to him, he fired up IE, and when the warning page came up there was a flurry of keystrokes and...VOILA! He was in! I asked him to show me what I did. He said, "Dad, it's enough that I actually showed you THAT I can do it--I'm NOT showing you HOW!" I did not renew that software.

Aaron.Netsell
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re: The myth of parental controls
Aaron.Netsell   1/14/2011 10:12:07 PM
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Duhhh...don't give your admin password to your kids. Parental controls plus (and most importantly) common sense parenting have worked fine for us; Limit computer time, maintain exclusive admin rights keep computers in public spaces, and talk to kids about all the crap out there. Show them there is life off-line! Play guitar...

treyfer
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re: The myth of parental controls
treyfer   1/14/2011 9:57:19 PM
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Brian, We think a lot alike, and I appreciate the WSJ link. Over Christmas, I purchased a charging valet for the entry hallway, and we're leaving devices there to charge when we come in, and overnight. But we also bought my oldest an iPod Touch, so the jury's still out - maybe the curfew becomes later, maybe before dinnertime, until the morning. The thought of a teenager taking "FaceTime" to their bedroom opens Pandora's Box (not the music service) to untold temptations. Also, as someone else has said, children learn behavior from their parents...yes, that means me. - Trey

embedded_guy123
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re: The myth of parental controls
embedded_guy123   1/13/2011 2:10:27 PM
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One simple thing to do is to confine computer use to a "public" area in your house - like the kitchen or living room. Allowing your child to use a computer in total privacy for hours on end is not a good idea. If junior knows mom can see what he is surfing while cooking dinner, he will be less tempted to look at garbage.

Sheetal.Pandey
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re: The myth of parental controls
Sheetal.Pandey   1/13/2011 4:32:49 AM
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so true, you cannot leave everything on technology to take care of the child. parents have to educate their child whats good and whats bad. While internet can be so informative, it can be extremely destructive for child. I am now thinking ways to hide my laptop away. Internet is so addictive.

agk
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re: The myth of parental controls
agk   1/13/2011 2:06:31 AM
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Children mostly copy their parents in their childhood. So parents need to expose all their good activities to their children by explaining their advantages. Parents spend more time with their children and mould them with good ideas. At some time when the parents feel that their children are into the right understanding slowly introduce by talking the wrong things and their results. This will give them a strong fence.With that with the children parents can be confident to give the freedom to their beautifull kids

rnass
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re: The myth of parental controls
rnass   1/12/2011 11:27:39 PM
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Raise 'em right and trust them. They're going to be looking at stuff you don't want them to see at their friends houses anyway.

krisi
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re: The myth of parental controls
krisi   1/12/2011 7:41:09 PM
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Brian, good luck, let us know later how the 9 or 10pm non-technology break works out for your family...in my place we have a rule of no technology at meal times and strive for dinner together everyday (obviously that doesn't work all the time)...Kris

Brian Fuller2
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re: The myth of parental controls
Brian Fuller2   1/12/2011 6:33:04 PM
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So David's post and the WSJ article have brought this issue to a head in our family. And the short-term answer is simply a tech lock-down at 9 or 10 p.m. every night. This may mean literally relinquishing laptops to yours truly every evening. We know we get along famously when we're unplugged (camping etc.) but crossing the Rubicon to that promised land (a tangled metaphor, I admit) is easier said that done. Appreciate any insights, folks!

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