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I ain't cut out for this high-falutin' math

Don Dodge
1/25/2011 01:03 PM EST

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fej1
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re: I ain't cut out for this high-falutin' math
fej1   2/2/2011 4:32:36 AM
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I too have an amusing IBM story, but it's not a prank or joke. http://laughtonelectronics.com/comm_mfg/commercial_ibm1130.html (FWIW the other content on my site is comparatively serious.)

daleste
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re: I ain't cut out for this high-falutin' math
daleste   1/29/2011 8:37:35 PM
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Great story. I guess this is why you can't get schematics any more. Now everything is integrated into a chip, so it is hard to hack the hardware. But there is so much software to mess with.

bcarso
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re: I ain't cut out for this high-falutin' math
bcarso   1/27/2011 4:41:07 PM
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Good conjecture. More likely the age factor was just incidental---although clearly he knew his stuff.

zeeglen
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re: I ain't cut out for this high-falutin' math
zeeglen   1/26/2011 7:34:55 PM
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Possibly this guy was a lab-type engineer whom the techs called for in desperation. The clue is the "white coat". Being one who did not normally visit customers the suit-and-tie policy might not apply.

bcarso
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re: I ain't cut out for this high-falutin' math
bcarso   1/26/2011 5:45:14 PM
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Love it! But how did Big Blue ever sanction the superannuated tech's departure from the dress code? I guess he must have just been that good.

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