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Hard to believe, but true: old products still available, and unchanged!

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antiquus
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re: Hard to believe, but true: old products still available, and unchanged!
antiquus   2/21/2011 8:11:00 PM
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It should not be too surprising when you consider the magnitude of the TI-30 and TI-80 series marketing collateral. Having supplied algebra and mathematics textbooks to almost every public school and many colleges in the country, textbooks that just happen to include keystroke-guided how-tos, it is no mystery that TI is inclined to continue with the form-factor and user interface. Because of the successful effort embedding their product into the curricula, TI calculators are now the defacto standard for what-to-buy lists in most school districts. Hats off to the TI guys that thought of this; our "educators" bought it hook, line and sinker.

Silicon_Smith
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re: Hard to believe, but true: old products still available, and unchanged!
Silicon_Smith   2/27/2011 8:58:08 PM
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And there is still a lot happening for 'education technology' at TI.

antiquus
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re: Hard to believe, but true: old products still available, and unchanged!
antiquus   2/21/2011 8:13:41 PM
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P.S. Its more than 2 decades -- TI-30s were available in the late 70's.

Patk0317
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re: Hard to believe, but true: old products still available, and unchanged!
Patk0317   2/21/2011 11:22:37 PM
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Are you sure? I purchased an LED based TI calculator in the mid 80's. Very expensive and ate the battery. When were LCDs in common use?

Robert.MacLachlan
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re: Hard to believe, but true: old products still available, and unchanged!
Robert.MacLachlan   2/23/2011 1:16:49 PM
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I think they kept the TI-30 designation after the change to LCD. It was already a standard by then. I have a TI-30 simulator on my android phone now (realcalc) with a few tasteful upgrades, but the same look.

antiquus
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re: Hard to believe, but true: old products still available, and unchanged!
antiquus   2/23/2011 4:20:42 PM
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Yep. My better half bought one in college in '78 or '79. As others have suggested, it was LED instead of LCD, but the keyboard layout was quite recognizable.

JMWilliams
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re: Hard to believe, but true: old products still available, and unchanged!
JMWilliams   2/21/2011 8:48:46 PM
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I bought one of the first HP-55 programmable calculators in, I think it was, 1975. I had to send it in once under warranty, to replace the super-cheap power switch, which was a slider making contact directly on copper traces on the circuit board! But, otherwise, it was a great calculator: Over 3 hours between recharges of the NiCd battery, and it combined a programmable calculator and counter/timer.. After I upgraded to an HP-67 (same stupid power switch!), I soldered an electrolytic capacitor into the battery compartment, and I still use it that way, with power adapter plugged into a wall socket. But, I don't calculate any more with the HP-55: I've had it continuously turned on, with the counter running for over 30 years now, as a way to detect whether there has been a power failure while I was away at work. If the count has stopped, or the display is garbled, I know my AC line has gone down! They don't make them that way, any more.

_hm
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re: Hard to believe, but true: old products still available, and unchanged!
_hm   2/22/2011 1:10:22 AM
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I got Casio FX-81 as a gift in year 1981. I am using the same calculator for almost 30 years. Also, I changesd the orignal Casio battery only around six months back! What a wonderful engineered product.

prabhakar_deosthali
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re: Hard to believe, but true: old products still available, and unchanged!
prabhakar_deosthali   2/22/2011 9:54:15 AM
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I bought a SEIKO automatic wrist watch in Chicago in 1979. Till date this watch is working perfectly and needed no maintenance except may be some cleaning and greasing by my local watch repairer. About ten years back, when there was too m uch of a craze for digital watches I bought one digital watch and kept my Seiko in a drawer. That digital watch lasted for only about three years and I switched back to my old Seiko which started functioning at the flick of my wrist. My hat off to Seiko for such as masterpiece of engineering which has lasted almost my active life-time. All these mechanical watches are in fashion again. They have lasted the test of TIME!

dxevc
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re: Hard to believe, but true: old products still available, and unchanged!
dxevc   2/22/2011 11:05:07 AM
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I onw and use an old HP21C bought in 1986.

DeviceGuy
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re: Hard to believe, but true: old products still available, and unchanged!
DeviceGuy   2/22/2011 7:59:48 PM
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How do you define "high-tech"? Not only have carbon-zinc dry cells had little exterior changes, but the internal workings have also been virtually unchanged for roughly 100 years. I suppose they're no longer considered "high tech" but that also points to the relative transitory nature of that term. No doubt many would no longer consider the Walkman high-tech, though it was 30 years ago.

Bellhop
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re: Hard to believe, but true: old products still available, and unchanged!
Bellhop   2/22/2011 8:22:17 PM
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What about all of those LED alarm clocks? I noticed that a new one was constructed with modules strikingly similar to my old one from the 1970s - right down to the PMOS LSI chip!

martinm_de
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re: Hard to believe, but true: old products still available, and unchanged!
martinm_de   2/23/2011 9:12:11 AM
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Sharp PC 1401 Basic-enabled calculator still available at ebay for the conaisseurs bought in 1985, it now has its 4th or 5th battery set , so one every 5 years. Still working.

El Bee
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re: Hard to believe, but true: old products still available, and unchanged!
El Bee   2/23/2011 3:53:34 PM
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"You Know You're An Engineer If..." ...You've ever tried to repair a five dollar radio.

Rick.Giles
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re: Hard to believe, but true: old products still available, and unchanged!
Rick.Giles   2/23/2011 4:50:59 PM
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I wish HP would learn this lesson. Some of their best built and functional calculators were made in the early '80s by HP. With the exception of the 12C (which is still in production after 27+ years!), they tend to totally change their line every few years. This wouldn’t be bad, except they don’t always keep the positive features of earlier models and their quality has gone way down hill. I assume that they are trying to make them cheaper to compete with TI. My HP 35s feels like its ready to break, at any moment, after just 2 years. My HP 41CX is still being used after 27 years! My HP 32Sii is still going strong after 19 years! My HP 34C is still working after 30 years! The TI EL-531W has felt like it will break every time I hit a key since I bought it a year ago. (Yea, it was cheap, only about $15, but still not worth the price.) Frankly, as an engineer, I would rather pay the premium that HP used to command to get back the quality and features of those earlier calculators. When you find these gems on EBAY, you often pay more for them now, used and scratched, they when they were new!! Hey HP, PLEASE RE-ISSUE SOME OF YOUR EARLY MODELS!!! THEY ARE/WERE GREAT!!

Andy_I
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re: Hard to believe, but true: old products still available, and unchanged!
Andy_I   2/23/2011 5:10:07 PM
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Now where can I get the switch and keys on my HP-35 repaired? There was a day when HP used to do this. But about 10 years ago I looked into it (being an HP employee) but couldn't find anything. I think it was one of those things Carly Fiorina and corporate management thought they could shed to make people think it was just a computer company. RPN rules!!

bcarso
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re: Hard to believe, but true: old products still available, and unchanged!
bcarso   2/23/2011 5:43:12 PM
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Still using my HP 15C and don't know what I would do without it. Just for a backup I bought a newer model, the 35s. I had to go and get it out of its cover to see what the model was, and I see the two lithium coin cells have already failed! I do miss my "Woodstock" series HP25, with the LED display. Despite its limited functionality, it was a "gateway" to a potential life of programming: after I got it I spent two full weeks writing programs, and finally utterly exhausted its capabilities. Friends who got the HP65 and later the HP67 in some cases became consumed with the things, spending man-years writing programs which they insisted were going to be so useful once perfected. But I went back to circuit design, knowing that I didn't want to become a programmer.

_hm
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re: Hard to believe, but true: old products still available, and unchanged!
_hm   2/23/2011 5:45:35 PM
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Person who repaired them may be retired or he may have moved to better opportunity. Training new person for very week demand and maintaiing tools, test systems is very expensive affair. They refuse not only the simple calculator, but the refuse systems used in F-15 fighter aircraft and many other defence hardware. But some afficiondos do purchase and keep them in quantity when they get last buy notice.

Katie OQ
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re: Hard to believe, but true: old products still available, and unchanged!
Katie OQ   2/23/2011 10:05:43 PM
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I still have a nice HP-41CV which runs a compact version of "Supreme" - the semiconductor (device design) simulation program. I can't say I use it, now that we have so much arithmetical power (not mathematical power) now beneath our teenie-tiny fingers; but since it is complete, with original case and instruction booklet, even the original box - all in pristine condition - I'm keeping it for display in my private museum along with spark-gap transmitter, crystal sets and radios from the first quarter of the last century - most of which still work as well as they did when first purchased. But then, I have ICs I designed for ADI back in the 1970s that are still in the catalog, making solid contributions to the bottom line. I expect the same can be said of the 555 (although the AD537 is a far better part...) and the uA741 - though surely with so many excellent and cheap op amps out there, I find THAT surprising. One can readily buy all manner of vacuum tubes, on eBay, for example: but they are not the first thing that springs to mind when about to invoke the (dubious "high-gain") claims often made for todays' op amps... oh,,, you mean DC gain. Yeah, but that's rarely important. On the other hand, I am currely resurrecting the analog computer theme, using Philbrick K2-W op amp modules (2x12AX7s) whose open-loop DC gain is an embarrassing x1,000 and whose input offset of 1.5V makes one wonder how anyone could ever make a decent computer out of them... Barrie

kdboyce
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re: Hard to believe, but true: old products still available, and unchanged!
kdboyce   3/1/2011 7:44:24 AM
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There is a wide range of 'classic' IC's that have been in production 25-30 years. Aside from working well in many applications, you can find them anywhere. And yes, there are improvements on them in the market. People tend to use what they understand, or have mastered, or are too lazy to change so long as it works. The 741 or 555 type devices are proof of that.

BicycleBill
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re: Hard to believe, but true: old products still available, and unchanged!
BicycleBill   2/23/2011 11:30:21 PM
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Thanks Barrie--your special perspective is always welcome! And the AD574 "complete" 12b ADC IC is still available (even in a DIP package), with a new die, but it is form, fit, and functionally the same after 30 years (though specs of the newer versions are somewhat better, I believe).

ashutosh.pavaskar
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re: Hard to believe, but true: old products still available, and unchanged!
ashutosh.pavaskar   2/25/2011 7:11:40 AM
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Still use my Casio College Fx 100 bought in 1986 - both my kids have unsuccessfully tried to destroy it by sitting on it, throwing it around and once dipping it in a bucket of water. Works every single time it is switched on! Thanks to the engineering teams at Casio for other goodies like my databank wrist watch and the film watches as well.

bruce_blv
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re: Hard to believe, but true: old products still available, and unchanged!
bruce_blv   2/25/2011 9:20:35 PM
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Your linkin: "http://tinyurl.com/3425pnb" to the mm5316 data sheet is in error. Currently: "http://www.reed-electronics.com/tmworld/contents/pdf/TMW06_0206Clockpaper.pdf" should be: "http://www.tmworld.com/file/6600-Tmw06_0206clockpaper.pdf"

agk
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re: Hard to believe, but true: old products still available, and unchanged!
agk   2/26/2011 2:31:45 PM
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Ti calculators are very good. They have a wide range. The development at TI for calculator products are going hand in hand with teaching curriculam and so they are successfull. Also they update and retain the best models sold in the past time.

retired geek
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re: Hard to believe, but true: old products still available, and unchanged!
retired geek   2/28/2011 6:13:32 AM
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I have an HP 11C which works perfect in every respect. I bought it about 10 years ago from a Nephew who had no idea what polish notation was. I always wanted one of them but wasn't willing to pay the price and settled on the TI SR-56. I'm going to try the electrolytic cap to see if it will still work.

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