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The end of American motors

David Blaza
2/24/2011 12:59 PM EST

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Duane Benson
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re: The end of American motors
Duane Benson   2/24/2011 9:33:24 PM
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I wonder if the next innovation in motors will be around greater customization in smaller volumes with reasonable costs. I don't know much about the industrial motor market, but I assume that there is already quite a bit of custom work. I also assume that it's expensive, highly volume dependent and very slow. (Anyone feel free to correct me if you know otherwise) Many other market segments in the electronics / electrical industry, such as PCB fab and prototype assembly, have taken this path. The mega-volumes go off shore and the domestic industry has learned how to deliver quick-turns at low volumes without blowing price constraints out of the water.

David Ashton
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re: The end of American motors
David Ashton   2/24/2011 9:35:50 PM
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ABB is a good company and you don't indicate that they have plans to move production offshore. So it could be worse? Presumably Baldor's motors DO meet the energy efficiency requirements noted in your first paragraph, so they'll be in a good position to continue the expansion noted in your second-last paragraph?

easy_eddie
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re: The end of American motors
easy_eddie   2/24/2011 9:52:05 PM
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After reading this I went and checked on Emerson Electric, a US company I used to work for, which also manufactures electric motors. I just read that they are selling their motor division to Nidec, a Japanese company. Oh well.

JLS
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re: The end of American motors
JLS   2/24/2011 10:06:49 PM
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Maybe the question isn't why are all the motor manufacturers foreign, but why are the American motor companies for sale? Sounds to me like these American companies are only thinking about lining their stockholder's pockets for a quick buck.

fdunn0
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re: The end of American motors
fdunn0   2/25/2011 12:30:50 AM
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That is what it all comes down to, the mighty payoff. Our short term markets where a company that is viable can be made a penny stock in a day is just plain crazy. Unless a motor company is willing and able to completely modernize their manufacturing with less US workers and more CNC, Robotics, etc. then they really don't stand a chance against a chinese company. Sure the product is going to be junk but the stockholders have spoken. What a F*****g pity. Fred Dunn

no clever name
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re: The end of American motors
no clever name   2/25/2011 3:15:24 PM
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Let's say a CEO sells a division, and the new owner modernizes and makes it profitable. Does the BOD of the selling company ever look and see how it did, and realize their CEO is incompetent and making bad decisions. Never happens does it. Rod

cbbear
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re: The end of American motors
cbbear   2/25/2011 3:42:21 PM
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At least one of the main reasons for the buying of these US companies is more prosaic: cheap dollar.

Clyde_rel
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re: The end of American motors
Clyde_rel   2/25/2011 7:30:54 PM
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There is a small motor company here in Colorado, UQM (formerly Unique Mobility) that focuses mainly on automotive applications. Are they still American owned?

agk
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re: The end of American motors
agk   2/26/2011 2:47:48 PM
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Like many things change in our life time the business owners also change. It also means again many new motor manufactures will come in future.Probably i guess that copper less motors will come from Americans.

sleibson
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re: The end of American motors
sleibson   3/1/2011 12:13:51 AM
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The article reminded me of Pittman electric motors, which used to power slot cars back in the 1960s before the Japanese Mabuchis took over. I looked them up. They're still available and seem to be offered from a US firm named Ametek. Perhaps Pittmans are no longer manufactured in the US, but it looks like they might still be manufactured in the US.

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