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Meandering musings on Altiumís bold and exciting move to Shanghai

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Max The Magnificent
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re: Meandering musings on Altiumís bold and exciting move to Shanghai
Max The Magnificent   4/11/2011 10:03:19 PM
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Funnily enough, I saw a TV program on Shanghai a couple of months ago and thought "That looks like an exciting place to be" (maybe the management team at Altium saw the same program :-)

_hm
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re: Meandering musings on Altiumís bold and exciting move to Shanghai
_hm   4/11/2011 10:53:11 PM
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Is HQ for organization must? Large transnational organizations can dispenses with HQ. When I worked for ABB, they had HQ but only 45 person worked from that office.

Max The Magnificent
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re: Meandering musings on Altiumís bold and exciting move to Shanghai
Max The Magnificent   4/12/2011 1:41:38 PM
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I couldn't tell you -- I'm a one-man company so my HQ is wherever I happen to be at the moment (grin)

mkellett
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re: Meandering musings on Altiumís bold and exciting move to Shanghai
mkellett   4/14/2011 7:22:00 AM
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I used Protel in the past and have considered buying Altium but backed off because I felt that too much resource was going into turning a reasonable (even good) PCB design tool into a PCB tool with a tightly integrated but very second rate set of FPGA tools and C compilers. This latest talk of "clouds" sounds like more of the same. Add to that the loss of management focus when you move huge chunks of a business from one country to another ..... I'm going to keep well away for at least a couple of years to see how it turns out.

mrwood
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re: Meandering musings on Altiumís bold and exciting move to Shanghai
mrwood   4/14/2011 10:07:54 AM
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One can bet the real reason for this move has everything to do with dodging the Aussie tax structure. You can also bet that within a year there will be Altium clones based upon stolen Altium IP coming out of China.

tato76
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re: Meandering musings on Altiumís bold and exciting move to Shanghai
tato76   4/14/2011 3:54:29 PM
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I know that my company has a lot of problems regarding hiring and consequent attrition of engineers in Shanghai. Luckily we've been able to deal with this without sacrificing quality. But I admit that highly rotating engineering job market is great for the engineers, bad for the product quality. I've heard the average increase in pay in Shanghai per year is about 20%!!!! So I don't know how Altium is going to deal with this.

Bob_Kozio
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re: Meandering musings on Altiumís bold and exciting move to Shanghai
Bob_Kozio   4/15/2011 11:21:17 PM
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Thank you for being a Protel customer and I hope I can shed some light on the situation. Altium is acting upon its vision of a unified design platform (replacing tool chains), connected device design (IDC forecasts 15B devices by 2015) and cloud utilization (check out Amazon web services and our recent acquisition of Morfik). These actions/strategies are in tune with technology trends. So Altium Designer will be much different than Protel. Give Altium Designer 10 a try - I think you will like it.

YeqoJQnnkpuXHfvw
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re: Meandering musings on Altiumís bold and exciting move to Shanghai
YeqoJQnnkpuXHfvw   4/18/2011 5:45:21 AM
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"Unified Design Platforms" don't work. They inevitably end up linking good tools with bad -- usually in a way that is hard to work around. Face it, NOBODY makes good tools for all situations. On the China front -- you may see China as a new and exciting market. I see it as a land of spammers and totalitarian government. I'm sure this will change -- eventually -- but until then, I'm not allowing my browser to talk to any company sited in China.

MaxSeeley
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re: Meandering musings on Altiumís bold and exciting move to Shanghai
MaxSeeley   5/12/2011 1:12:17 AM
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I could not disagree more. Nothing is more frustrating then moving between different packages for different functions. In addition, the functions of most of these different packages are highly intertwined and most are based on the same underlying principles (netlists). So you enjoy exporting a netlist from Capture to Allegro, then to PSpice, then? Every function performed in Altium is well implemented. Plus, the walls between software and hardware are coming down and Altium is in my opinion well prepared to deal with this transition. Plus, you are hardly handcuffed to Altium - you can easily export to numerous other platforms if that is your thing. If you hate integrated environments, then you are going to have slim pickings for EDA tools - just check out the blogs at the major software companies and you will find this is the direction the industry is heading.

aefrgqergqwergqerg
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re: Meandering musings on Altiumís bold and exciting move to Shanghai
aefrgqergqwergqerg   4/20/2012 11:26:58 PM
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Altium has been quite entertaining over the years. There was Protel, a crash monster so unstable in 1998, a buddy gave me his paid-for copy and went back to Orcad. Then there was the 10-year period when Altium became the elephant graveyard for CAD tools. Tango, PCAD, and I think a few others. When we hardware people gave the software weenies so darn much memory the memory leaks didn't crash the machine, Altium actually stayed up for more than an hour. They started hitting their stride about 10 years ago. They do library creation and maintenance better than OrCAD ever dreamed of. They seemed to understand that the schematic and PCB are really the same information. Symbols and wires in the schematic are footprints and traces in the PCB. And they put in a big button to synchronize the two. A few years ago they did 3-D which I thought was too whizzy, but buddies tell me that they have caught mistakes with it that would have otherwise cost a board spin. Like Orcad going off on PLD design back at Version 7, Altium had to tangent off on FPGA design a few years ago. The upside is that now they actually design the FPGA demo boards so there is actually someone on the property that uses the program. It has gotten a lot better due to that.

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