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Death of the SoC

Ron Collett
5/10/2011 04:06 PM EDT

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rickclucas
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re: Death of the SoC
rickclucas   5/16/2011 10:54:59 PM
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Another major factor is that SOCs have not really been complete Systems, only large chunks, as time moves on we are seeing higher levels of integration therfore reducing the number of SOCs in an actual system, eventually we will have only one per system with as much of the other componets part of it as well.

Raul Lopez
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re: Death of the SoC
Raul Lopez   5/16/2011 4:15:15 PM
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I agree with Ron in the decrease of SoC tapeouts. In the video ASIC industry there is a strong consolidation going on that is going to increase as Intel, AMD and NVIDIA add more HW-accelerated support for video codecs and video processing.

Raul Lopez
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re: Death of the SoC
Raul Lopez   5/16/2011 4:09:29 PM
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Unfortunately the pipeline seldom happens with such efficiency. Design engineers are often tied up in documentation, SW bring-up, early-access customer bugs and other less-than-ideal tasks for at least two quarters after tapeout.

chipdude
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re: Death of the SoC
chipdude   5/16/2011 3:12:50 PM
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Perhaps 3D IC technology will improve the productivity, reduce costs, and still allow for high levels of functionality. It looks very promising.

resistion
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re: Death of the SoC
resistion   5/14/2011 11:40:59 PM
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The problem seems to be customization rather than SoC. SiP wouldn't solve the problem either.

cliffnotes
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re: Death of the SoC
cliffnotes   5/14/2011 8:21:25 PM
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The way to solve the problem is automation. Why use a shovel when you can use a bulldozer? www.analograils.com/why

NickLethaby
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re: Death of the SoC
NickLethaby   5/13/2011 1:14:22 AM
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Don't forget about the software. Typically customers are expecting Linux, Android, and WinCE ports along with some RTOS ports as well. With today's SoCs having 30 or more peripherals, including graphics, multimedia, and protocol accelerators that need to integrated into hihger level stacks, you often need dozens of SW engineers as well. Furthermore with the semiconductor-supplied software now running into tens or hundreds of megabytes, the application support burden becomes significant as well.

nosubject
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re: Death of the SoC
nosubject   5/12/2011 11:40:20 PM
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But SOC developments are pipelined. At the end of the 2nd year, the 1st SoC is validated and into the production; the 4th SoC is in design; the 2nd and 3rd SoC are in verification and bringup. 2years development cycle cannot justify the high labor cost. Instead, because of the design pipeline, the labor cost is lower than the $20~30M I put there.

RCollett
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re: Death of the SoC
RCollett   5/12/2011 9:20:29 PM
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SoC development cycles are typically around two years, so the $20M to $30M labor cost needs to be doubled.

nosubject
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re: Death of the SoC
nosubject   5/12/2011 2:28:38 PM
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"Today, the number is a mere three, with a combined development cost of is $150 million to $200 million." How to get the estimation of $150~200M development cost? The cost of 100~200 engineers per year is about $20~30M. Beyond that, the major costs are IP cost, license cost, fab and tools. Are those costs more than 80% of the SOC development cost? (150M-30M)/150M = 80%.

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